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position of "now"

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position of "now"

Postby Tukanja » Thu Nov 12, 2009 2:49 pm

Thanks to low-cost airlines, people with itchy feet who couldn't afford air fares in the past can now travel.

The sentence's pretty OK but I would like to ask a question about is it possible to say,
' Thanks to the low-costs people with itchy feet who couldn't afford air fares in the past now can travel.'

Let me say it's about having a word with someone who's familiar with the civil aviation.

In addition I also noticed it is said

..can now travel.

Is it right word order if it's been said this way

..who couldn't afford air fares in the past now can travel.

The third way for me is ..can travel now.

Thank You
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Re: low-cost airlines

Postby Tukanja » Tue Nov 17, 2009 7:38 pm

Now I have another question even this first one hasn't been answered.

What low-cost airlines means?

In my poor opinion, which has grown up from what I've seeing in some both dictionaries and grammar books, it doesn't mean low-cost airline companies.
It means low-cost airline business.

And an airliner means an aircraft which transport the passengers by going at the air.
Also I am interested in knowing what does airline is, in the phrase airline company.

airline company ~ (it means airline business company) I wonder is airline here noun or adjective.
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Re: low-costs

Postby Archoes » Wed Nov 10, 2010 8:19 am

Tukanja wrote:Is it right word order if it's been said this way

..who couldn't afford air fares in the past now can travel.

The third way for me is ..can travel now.

Thank You


Yes the wordings are good. The "can travel now" is specific that highly supports the subject. You don't need to paraphrase it again.
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Re: now

Postby Josef » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:22 am

can now travel = the most idiomatic (natural) way to say this in this context
now can travel = possible
can travel now = not right, because it suggests they can travel today (now) but perhaps not tomorrow
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Re: low-cost airlines

Postby Josef » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:25 am

Tukanja wrote:What low-cost airlines means?

In my poor opinion, which has grown up from what I've seeing in some both dictionaries and grammar books, it doesn't mean low-cost airline companies.
It means low-cost airline business.


It means low-cost airline companies or businesses.
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Re: airline company

Postby Josef » Wed Nov 10, 2010 9:41 am

Tukanja wrote:And an airliner means an aircraft which transport the passengers by going at the air.
Also I am interested in knowing what does airline is, in the phrase airline company.

airline company ~ (it means airline business company) I wonder is airline here noun or adjective.

A "liner" is a large passenger ship that used to be used (before aircraft) on a regular "line", for example across the Atlantic Ocean from Southampton in England to New York in the USA.

An airliner is an aircraft on a regular line. So a Thai Air Boeing 747 that flies regularly from Bangkok to London is an airliner, but the Boeing 747 that flies the President of the United States on jaunts around the world could not be called an airliner.

Thai Air is an airline. It can be and often is called (somewhat redundantly) an "airline company" or an "airline business".

In "airline company", the word "airline" is a "noun used as adjective" to define the noun "company"

In fact "airline" itself is a compound noun composed of two nouns, with "air" being a noun used as adjective to define "line".
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Re: position of "now"

Postby Tukanja » Wed Nov 10, 2010 2:30 pm

Thank Josef :-)
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