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What DO English native speakers say in these situations?

Help on English vocab, including idioms, slang and sayings

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Re: How to describe these situations with idioms?

Postby Tukanja » Tue Oct 14, 2008 1:21 pm

Since I haven't known the answers and also having no time today towards finding them out, I am letting you know next link which the answers are to be in. :-)

http://www.englishclub.com/ref/Idioms/index.htm
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Re: What DO English native speakers say in these situations?

Postby Josef » Thu Oct 23, 2008 7:04 am

Great answer from lafemme (thanks).

I've just found that we have "give (it) your all" in the Idioms reference, so you can see more about it as well as sample sentences and quiz at: http://www.englishclub.com/ref/esl/Idio ... all_69.htm
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Re: What DO English native speakers say in these situations?

Postby Tukanja » Thu Oct 23, 2008 11:08 am

Boys are you sure that messing around is the right phrasal verb for playing tricks to someone, to deceive someone.
Why not
Stop taking me in, will you!
:?:
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Re: What DO English native speakers say in these situations?

Postby Josef » Thu Oct 23, 2008 11:20 am

Tukanja wrote:Boys are you sure that messing around is the right phrasal verb for playing tricks to someone, to deceive someone. Why not
Stop taking me in, will you! :?:

Possibly, but that would more likely be "Stop trying to take me in, will you!" because evidently you haven't been taken in. It also sounds more formal than "Stop messing around!" or "Stop messing me around!" As always, everything depends on the exact context.

take someone in (phrasal verb): to fool or cheat or deceive someone

NB: "take someone in" also means "accommodate someone"

PS: microcat didn't specifically ask for phrasal verbs
PPS: Are you sure that "lafemme" (which in French at least means "the woman") is a boy? :roll:
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Re: What DO English native speakers say in these situations?

Postby Tukanja » Thu Oct 23, 2008 1:20 pm

Stop trying to taking me in, will you?

Stop trying to having me taken in, will you?

:roll: :?:
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Re: What DO English native speakers say in these situations?

Postby Josef » Thu Oct 23, 2008 7:05 pm

Tukanja wrote:Stop trying to taking me in, will you?

Stop trying to having me taken in, will you?

:roll: :?:

NO!
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