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Dinner vs supper

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Dinner vs supper

Postby Andie » Sun Nov 12, 2006 6:04 am

What's difference between having dinner and having supper? According to the dictionary both of them are "main meals". Are they synonyms? Thanks!
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Postby Dixie » Sun Nov 12, 2006 9:26 am

I think that, in Britain, dinner is more important than supper. But I hope someone from there comes and explains better, because I'm not really sure.
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Postby shokin » Mon Nov 13, 2006 10:37 am

There is a difference between (some regions of) France and Switzerland :

Switzerland :

In the morning we eat "le déjeûner".
In the midday we eat "le dîner".
In the evening we eat "le souper".

France :

In the morning they eat "le petit déjeûner".
In the midday they eat "le déjeûner".
In the evening they eat "le dîner".

Like :

In all french-speaking regions (Belgian, Quebecer, French, etc.), people say - for "eighty" - "quatre-vingt", except in Switzerland... where we say "huitante".

(Switzerland / out-of-Switzerland)

seventy : septante / soixante-dix
seventy-one : septante et un / soixante et onze
...
eighty : huitante / quatre-vingt
eighty-one : huitante et un / quatre vingt un
...
ninety : nonante / quatre-vingt dix
ninety-one : nontante et un / quatre vingt onze
...

:lol: We - Swiss - often say that "Les Français ne parlent pas français." (French people don't speak french. For example : they say "soixante-dix" but they say "la guerre de septante".) :lol:

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Postby Dixie » Mon Nov 13, 2006 11:20 am

Very interesting, shokin, but I don't think that's what Andie was asking :lol:
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Postby shokin » Mon Nov 13, 2006 10:41 pm

:lol: Oups ! I did speak again about frenchship ! :lol:

I don't know much the english culture or the cultures of english-speaking countries (been only one week to London).

So... I can only give you :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinner

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supper

and their linked links.

Discussion about difference between dinner and supper (on a concurrent forum :twisted: )

Word of the day

And in my (paper) dictionnary :

dinner :

1. a meal taken in the evening
2. a meal taken at the midday, especially when it is the main meal of the day ; lunch
3a. a formal evening meal, as of a club, society
3b. a public banquet in honour of someone or something
4. a complete meal at a fixed price in a restaurant, table d'hôte (what a french-sounding locution :lol: )
5. your "génitif saxon" (of, relating to) : dinner plate, dinner hour, etc.

... (some locutions) ...

supper :

1. an evening meal, especially a light one
2. an evening social event featuring a supper

... (some locutions) ...



I am sorry... I cannot give you more from me. :lol:

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Last edited by shokin on Wed Nov 15, 2006 6:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby vince90 » Wed Nov 15, 2006 4:46 pm

I think in US “supper” and “dinner” mean the same for evening meals. “Supper” is an old term and it was used commonly many years ago. On the other hand “dinner” is used more often in modern times. So it doesn’t matter which one you use, it’s the same meaning. For me I prefer “dinner” instead of “supper”.
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Postby Andie » Wed Nov 15, 2006 7:54 pm

Thank you everyone! (It's so nice to have somebody answering your queries!! :P ) I'll stick to Vince90's answer though. I was reading Great Expectations, so it makes sense to say that the word "supper" is old-fashioned. Anyway, if anybody from English speaking countries uses it, I would be interested to know.
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Postby Dixie » Wed Nov 15, 2006 9:38 pm

I think it's still used in Britain... I'm not sure though.
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Re: Dinner vs supper

Postby sweethuman » Wed Jun 22, 2011 8:02 am

I think whatever eaten some hours before than dinner is supper and dinner is the food you eat at night.
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Re: Dinner vs supper

Postby Elisa » Tue Aug 02, 2011 2:42 pm

I think viceversa.
English people eat dinner at 6 pm. or so.
If they go to bed late (after cinema or theater...) they have a supper. Usually they eat what they left over at dinner or something light.
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