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lets discuss Russian literature

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lets discuss Russian literature

Postby LadyMacbeth » Thu Apr 19, 2007 6:37 pm

Hello :)
Lets discuss the greatest Russian books. I want to start with Anna Karenina. Here is an example review of this book (taken from the Net). Some people say it is the best novel ever written. Your ideas? LM :roll: :roll: :roll:

ANNA KARENINA - REVIEW.


"Anna Karenina" (1873-7) is a book that could be compared to a beautiful mosaic of interlinked stories. Thanks to Tolstoy's book, we get to know characters who sometimes seem so real that we cannot help but living with them the series of events that are recounted in this book.

Who are the main characters?. Well, we might begin by telling something about Anna Karenina, the woman who gives this book its title. Anna is someone who has found some satisfaction in a marriage to a husband she doesn't love. Her life isn't exciting, but she is comfortable, and has a son that means everything to her. Her world will be shaken when a nobleman, Count Vronsky, falls in love with her. He pursuits Anna until he convinces her to become his lover, indulging in an adulterous affair. But... will he go on loving her, even after she risks all for him?. And did she do the right thing, by following her heart without thinking about the consequences of her actions?.
There are many more characters, but I would like to highlight one of them: Levin. Levin is a rather eccentric gentleman farmer, who worries about things like the meaning of life, and allows the reader to share with him the kind of doubts that many have had, but few voice. He ends up finding happiness, but his path is not easy, especially because he is prone to reflect on issues that cause him anguish. His story is linked at the beginning of the book to that of Anna and Vronsky because the woman he loves, Kitty Shcherbatskaya, thinks she loves Vronsky. However, as the story advances, you will probably end up comparing Anna and Vronsky's relationship to that of Kitty and Levin. One is all drama, and passion; the other, calm and contentment. Which one is better?. And according to whom?.

I want to point out how well Tolstoy depicted 19th century Russian society, especially the differences between social classes and how much hypocrisy permeated the moral codes of polite society. If you pay close attention you will notice that several themes also to be found in other classics are recurrent in "Anna Karenina". One of them is fate, and some of the others are the omnipresence of death, the meaning of life, and the power of faith. There are many more things I would like to say about this book, but I think you will do better if you start to read "Anna Karenina" right now, instead of spending more of your time reading a long review such as this one :)

On the whole, I highly recommend this book. It is one of those few books that don't allow you to remain indifferent. You might hate it or love it, but it will necessarily make you think about several important subjects, whilst reading a good story.
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Postby Shimami » Fri Apr 27, 2007 10:10 am

Hi
I've never read "Anna Karenina", but I've read "Crime and Punishment" and "Arms and Gown" in Japanese. Another Rossian writer by whose writing I was very impressioned is Maxim Gogol. I like his short story, "Overcoat".
I don't know the precise story of "Anna Karenina" but the library near my house has many Rossian and classic books, so I'll try to read more Rossian literatures at this weekend!!
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Postby Cypress » Fri Apr 27, 2007 10:33 pm

Shimami wrote:Hi
I've never read "Anna Karenina", but I've read "Crime and Punishment" and "Arms and Gown" in Japanese. Another Rossian writer by whose writing I was very impressioned is Maxim Gogol. I like his short story, "Overcoat".
I don't know the precise story of "Anna Karenina" but the library near my house has many Rossian and classic books, so I'll try to read more Rossian literatures at this weekend!!


You probably meant to say Nicolai Gogol. But because you mixed up his first name with the name Maxim, it makes me think that you have read another Russian writer whose name is Maxim Gorkiy. Have you?
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Postby Shimami » Tue May 01, 2007 9:05 am

That's right!!
I was completely wrong and mixed up two famous Rossian writer. The most impressioned writer is Nicolai Gogol, but Maxim Gorky writing "The Lower Depth" was picturized by Akira Kurosawa, so I know the story.
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Postby illusion » Tue Jul 17, 2007 11:41 am

The only book I read that was written by a Russian author was "Crime and Punishment" and I must say I did enjoy it a lot :)))
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Postby **Elena** » Thu Jul 19, 2007 12:59 pm

WOW! Rasheed! Well done!
Nice collection!
I am very glad that there are ppl who interested in Russian literature.

Thanks!

BTW maybe you can offer something for reading of your native authors :wink:
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Postby illusion » Thu Jul 19, 2007 5:37 pm

Rasheed wrote:
illusion wrote:The only book I read that was written by a Russian author was "Crime and Punishment" and I must say I did enjoy it a lot :)))


Your choice is good ..

Please told us about it…


Well, it was a compulsory reading in my polish classes. I bought it during holidays so I had read it before the classes started. I must say it was really thrilling ;)
"crime and Punishment focuses on the mental anguish and moral dilemmas of Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov, an impoverished St. Petersburg student who formulates and executes a plan to kill a hated, unscrupulous pawnbroker for her money, thereby solving his financial problems and at the same time, he argues, ridding the world of evil... " (wikipedia ;))
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Postby Cypress » Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:57 pm

illusion wrote:The only book I read that was written by a Russian author was "Crime and Punishment" and I must say I did enjoy it a lot :)))


But what about Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita? Haven’t you read it?
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Postby mamuta » Fri Jul 20, 2007 7:23 am

The Master and Margarita is my favourite! I've read many classic Russian writers and poets: Lev Tolstoi, Alexy Tolstoi, Dostoievsky, Gorky, Pushkin, Mayakovsky etc., but this one is very special. It's beyond me how he managed to wrote it in such grim and merciles times :? ...and it is so close to me because we (as nations) base on the same experience.
I recommend it for all of you: its like balm to one's soul...
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Postby Cypress » Fri Jul 20, 2007 3:18 pm

mamuta wrote: I've read many classic Russian writers and poets: Lev Tolstoi, Alexy Tolstoi, Dostoievsky, Gorky, Pushkin, Mayakovsky etc., ...


Wow, I’m trully impressed. BTW, right now, I’m reading Aleksey Tolstoy’s book about Peter the Great. Very interesting and freighting too. What barbarian traditions and customs we used to have back then.
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