EnglishClub
Home Learn English Teach English MyEnglishClub

Please note that these ESL Forums are NOT part of MyEnglishClub. To post at these ESL Forums please register ↑ first.


meaning of phrases

Help on English vocab, including idioms, slang and sayings

Moderator: EC

meaning of phrases

Postby Sania » Mon May 03, 2010 5:13 pm

hi everybody
please help me out to define these phrases that I have heard in a film:
1.your only excuse is some candy-ass hallmark card sentiment?
(Is it a proverb?)
2.one of lifes legitimately sublime experiences its so utterly complete.
3.where exactly can we use tese words and for who(men or women?)?
Buddy,Guys,Dudes
4.you set your sight just a little too high this time.(proverb or not?)
5.you play it out.

thanks alot ;-)
Have a super day
Sania :roll:
Sania
Member
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 2:45 pm
Status: English Learner

Re: meaning of phrases

Postby vodkaphix » Tue May 04, 2010 3:59 pm

Hi Sania
These phrases are ALL American phrases, where as I am English and from England. There are slight variations as i am sure your aware of with American and English words and Phrases e.g Trunk (Amer) Boot (Eng) - meaning the rear storage area for your baggage etc in a car or automobile, again variants with American and English. About 95% of the language is the same though, so don't worry too much.
None of the phrases you ask about are proverbs - they are idioms or just slang phrases. Take a look at this website to get a better idea of American and English idioms. http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/
You can also research different words in American and English to define their meanings, just 'Google' them.
Hope this helps!
Vodkaphix
vodkaphix
Member
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Feb 13, 2010 12:50 pm
Location: France
Status: English Learner

Re: meaning of phrases

Postby Sania » Tue May 04, 2010 5:08 pm

Thanks a bunch my dear teacher.
;-) {-;
Sania
Member
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 2:45 pm
Status: English Learner

Re: meaning of phrases

Postby PureGuava » Thu May 27, 2010 4:37 pm

Sania wrote:1.your only excuse is some candy-ass hallmark card sentiment?
(Is it a proverb?)
2.one of lifes legitimately sublime experiences its so utterly complete.
3.where exactly can we use tese words and for who(men or women?)?
Buddy,Guys,Dudes
4.you set your sight just a little too high this time.(proverb or not?)
5.you play it out.


1. You're excuse, and it's insulting that it is your ONLY "best reason", is insulting, as it is very generic and tries to appeal to my emotions.

2. One of life's actual joyful experiences is in every way complete. (This is some what hard to do, as it was probably used in some context.)

3. Buddy - Informal; male friend. "Hey buddy, how's it going?"
Guys - Informal; group of male friends. "Hey guys, what's up?"
Dudes - Informal; Out of date - I wouldn't use this word. I'd use "guys", instead.

While these aren't exclusive to males, I haven't (and wouldn't) use for women.

4. Your expectations fell short, because you hoped for something that was unlikely to happen/to achieve. Guy to another guy: "I realize you talked to the model and want to date her, but she makes $500,000 a year and can get any guy she wants. I think you set your sights just a little too high (this time)."

5. See/follow it through by doing what you naturally and normally would do. Coach: "I know we are losing this football game, but it is only half-time so we need to keep trying and play it out."
PureGuava
Member
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Thu May 27, 2010 3:53 pm
Status: English Teacher

Re: meaning of phrases

Postby Sania » Wed Jun 02, 2010 5:44 pm

Daer Peanut and Pureguava:
thanks a lot for your replies ;-)
they were really so helpful for me and surley for the others. Pureguava said:
Dudes - Informal; Out of date - I wouldn't use this word. I'd use "guys", instead.

I dont know you have seen LOST series or not.because Hurley(an actor) used DUDES alot.(told it to the other men that were with him)
ex:dudes chill.

Anyway:
thanks a lot for thousand times ;-)
Sania
Member
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 2:45 pm
Status: English Learner

Re: meaning of phrases

Postby YourUSApal » Thu Jun 03, 2010 2:21 am

RE: question 1
Candy-ass means babyish, or childish. Immature. It is an insult.
Hallmark card sentiment: Hallmark is a popular brand of greeting cards. A Hallmark card sentiment would be a trite and insincere or at least unimaginative and unoriginal expression of a feeling. The phrase in its entirety means that instead of giving a heartfelt, deep and honest explanation, the person being addressed has provided only a superficial, impersonal excuse. The person speaking feels trivialized, as if he is not being taken seriously.
YourUSApal
Member
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Jun 03, 2010 2:10 am
Status: English Teacher

Re: meaning of phrases

Postby Tukanja » Sat Aug 21, 2010 3:19 pm

PureGuava wrote:
Sania wrote:3. Buddy - Informal; male friend. "Hey buddy, how's it going?"
Guys - Informal; group of male friends. "Hey guys, what's up?"
Dudes - Informal; Out of date - I wouldn't use this word. I'd use "guys", instead.

While these aren't exclusive to males, I haven't (and wouldn't) use for women.


Is it possible to say "boys" instead of "guys".
What is Boyce? a name?

Thanks
User avatar
Tukanja
Gold Member
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Wed Jul 16, 2008 3:47 pm
Status: English Learner

Re: meaning of phrases

Postby BenitaCarls » Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:01 am

Yes boys can be used informally instead of guys to address a group of males.

Boyce is probably just a name ...
BenitaCarls
New Member
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Feb 23, 2011 1:59 am
Status: English Teacher

Re: meaning of phrases

Postby alawton » Wed Mar 02, 2011 7:41 pm

"your only excuse is some candy-ass hallmark card sentiment". I love this! it sounds like my ex girl friend said it.... I believe the word "weak" could replace "candy-ass", but the original sounds so much better.


Andrew Lawton
http://drewseslfluencylessons.com
alawton
Silver Member
 
Posts: 65
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2010 2:57 am
Status: English Teacher


Return to Vocabulary Help

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 15 guests