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if you're in over your head on something

Help on English vocab, including idioms, slang and sayings

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if you're in over your head on something

Postby shedlightonme » Tue Sep 27, 2011 8:49 pm

I think this slang refers to something like "If you've got some problems"

I've looked it up in a dictionary and the meaning is rather clear

be in over your head
to be involved in a situation that is too difficult for you to deal with; example: I'm in over my head with all these exhibition arrangements.


The point I didn't understand is "be in over your head on/with" ?

The dictionary says the prepostion I must use is with, but the phrase with the preposition on is the one I had seen while I was watching a Tv Show.

Is there any difference between on and with in that context ? Thanks.

May I have your attention, please ? Would you bother to rate my written english ? Excellent, Good, Not bad, Poor.
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Re: if you're in over your head on something

Postby TheStephen » Fri Sep 30, 2011 7:51 pm

There is no difference in meaning at all.
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Re: if you're in over your head on something

Postby Matian » Wed Oct 05, 2011 9:16 pm

involved in something too difficult; overwhelmed; failing at a challenge
or If someone is in over their head, they are out of the depth in something they are involved in, and may end up in a mess.
ex: “I thought I could walk there but soon discovered I was in over my head and caught a bus.
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Re: if you're in over your head on something

Postby Matian » Wed Oct 05, 2011 9:18 pm

using on is much more common in spoken language,but there is no difference whatsoever.
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