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stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

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stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

Postby jakesakic » Sun Jan 27, 2013 3:27 pm

"As soon as jake officially stopped smoking" vs "As soon as jake officially stop smoking"

From what i found online:

-> Stopped + v-ing = to finish doing something that you do regularly or habit (is that correct?)

-> Stop + v-ing = _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ missing exact meaning here, any ideas?

Google wasn't that useful to find the latter because "stop" is too common, but knowing English-language there will be a subtle difference between the two, so if any of you can walk us through this one it would be grandly appreciated.

Thanks



Furthermore, i did use "As soon as I officially stopped smoking" because of it's On-going connotation and would argue that it makes a difference with non-ing verbs that convey a lesser on-going state and instead focus on the moment in which the event was over.


So as a secondary question: Would the "state" of the situation matter? and for that we will need the full sentence which was: As soon as I officially stopped smoking

Officially-> emphasis on the "complete and irrefutable" halt

Stopped-> emphasis on the "on-going" halt
Smoking-> habit in question

Any thought?
jakesakic
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Re: stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

Postby Kellogg » Mon Jan 28, 2013 9:17 am

Hello,

I am not sure what your question is, but here is something that may interest you:


1. Jake has stopped SMOKING. = He no longer smokes. (He has broken the habit.)

2. Jake has stopped TO SMOKE. = He has decided to take some time out of his activities to smoke; then he will resume his activities.
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Re: stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

Postby jakesakic » Mon Jan 28, 2013 7:54 pm

Maybe this will clarified the question:

"As soon as jake officially stopped smoking" vs "As soon as jake officially stop smoking"

From what i found online:

-> Stopped + v-ing = to finish doing something that you do regularly or habit (is that correct?)

-> Stop + v-ing = _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ missing exact meaning here, any ideas?

Thanks
jakesakic
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Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2013 2:58 pm
Status: English Teacher

Re: stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

Postby Kellogg » Wed Jan 30, 2013 2:41 pm

stoppED + gerund = to break a habit. Jake officially stopped smoking on December 30, 2012. He has not smoked again since that day.

*****

"As soon as Jake STOP smoking" is -- I believe -- "bad" English. You need "stopS."

The manager will give Jake the job as soon as he stopS smoking. (That company hires only non-smokers.) In other words, WHENEVER Jake stopS smoking, he will THEN get the job.
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Re: stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

Postby jakesakic » Wed Jan 30, 2013 3:09 pm

Still dooesn't address he question att hand regarding the difference in meanings, but you are right about the 3rd person, that was an oversight(Typo).

Fill in the gap:

-> He Stopped + v-ing = to finish doing something that you do regularly or habit
-> He Stops + v-ing = _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
jakesakic
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Re: stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

Postby Kellogg » Thu Jan 31, 2013 10:49 am

He StoppED smoking. = something that happened in the past. (He stoppED smoking last year.)

He stopS smoking. = a possibility in the future. (As soon as he stopS smoking, he will be hired; As soon as he DOES stop smoking, he ....)

*****

It could also refer to the action itself:

Tom smokes a lot every day. But he stopS smoking whenever he sees the manager walking down the hall. (Smoking in the building is prohibited.)
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Re: stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

Postby jakesakic » Thu Jan 31, 2013 12:14 pm

So would the use of "As soon As" affects their meaning or make them grammatically false?

[He stops smoking] -> Future Event....
[He stopped smoking] -> past event....

[As soon as jake officially stops smoking] -> Correct
[As soon as jake officially stopped smoking] -> False (as past-event is used with a future context???)

I know it's nitpicking, but my original intrigue is related to that context vs grammar situation where i have no clue what's allowed or not and what takes priority over what.

Thanks for keeping up with me
jakesakic
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Re: stop+V-ing vs stopped+V-ing

Postby Kellogg » Fri Feb 01, 2013 11:20 am

Jake was denied the position because he was a smoker. But as soon as Jake officially stopped smoking, the manager offered him the position. (as soon as = when)
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