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Slang

30 Slang Words beginning with R

Slang is a kind of language consisting of very informal words and phrases. Slang is more common in speech than in writing. Slang words are often used in a particular context or by a particular group of people.

These are English slang words beginning with the letter R. Click on a slang term for example sentences, notes, origins, quizzes and answers.

Slang

rabbit on British English

to talk for a long time, esp. about things that aren't important

racket (1)

loud noise that lasts a long time

racket (2)

a dishonest or illegal activity that makes money

rap (1) American and Australian English

to talk together in a relaxed way (v.) | a relaxed talk (n.)

rap (2)

to recite lyrics over a rhythmic beat

rap sheet American English

a criminal record

rat

a horrible, nasty person

Rats! American English

an exclamation that expresses mild annoyance

rattle

to upset or unnerve, to make someone feel nervous

ratty (1) American and Australian English

in poor condition; worn or damaged because of continuous use

ratty (2)

easily annoyed or upset, irritable

real

complete, utter; very, extremely

redneck American English Offensive

a lower-class white person from a rural background

rehab

place for treating addiction

rib

to tease someone in a friendly way

ribbing

a good-natured tease

riot

a very entertaining event or person

rip-off (1)

charging too much for something

rip-off (2)

a low-quality imitation or an unauthorised copy

ripped (1)

to have well-defined muscles

ripped (2) American and Australian English

intoxicated, drunk, drugged

ritzy

luxurious, high-class, expensive

rock

to be great, excellent

rock bottom

the lowest possible level, a low-point in someone's life

rubber American English

a condom

rubbish British English

to make very negative comments, to strongly criticise

rug

a man's hairpiece, a toupee

run down

(as in to run somebody/something down) to criticize unfairly or cruelly

run-in

a serious argument or problem with someone

runs

(as in the runs) a case of diarrhea

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