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I'm not sure about the translation in french and...

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I'm not sure about the translation in french and...

Unread postby neigebleu » Wed Oct 26, 2011 4:02 pm

Hi,
I dont use English so much, that's why I'm forgetting it. I need a help for the translating and other things. Could you please help me?

In 1724, Jonathan Swift wrote, "Whoever makes two blades of grass or two ears of corn grow where only one grew before serves mankind better than the whole race of politicians".

How to translate the statement of Jonathan in French? This is my translation: qui que ce soit plante deux brins d'herbe ou deux tranches de maïs dans un endroit où l'on y en plantait qu'un seule sert mieux l'humanité que tous les politiciens du monde.

I found my translation a little strange. And you, how do you translate it? If you dont know french, write the phrase in a simple way so that I can understand it easier, thanks!

And also, how do you correct these sentences: 1. I want that I pass the exam. (My correction: I want to pass the exam.) 2. They arrived at London. (mine: They arrived in London. But if "London" represente the airport of London, we can also use: at London, right?)

And we say: we met in university ou we met at university? Why?

And what's wrong with "travel" in: The travel through Chile was amazing. And what's wrong with: We had a fantastic time touring north and south america? --> It seems that the punctuation is not right, but how to correct?

Thank you if you could help me!!
neigebleu
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Re: I'm not sure about the translation in french and...

Unread postby arizona » Wed Dec 14, 2011 12:20 am

I don't know French so I'm no help on this part. I can say it might help to break it down into clauses. The part in brackets are different clauses.

[Whoever makes two blades of grass or two ears of corn grow [where only one grew before]] serves mankind better than the whole race of politicians.

As for your English parts, one and two are correct as you translated. As for the university question, are you speaking British English or American? I'm American, so I say We met in the university or We met at the university. Both are correct. British English is different, though.

You cannot say the travel. It is a verb, not a noun. For this sentence, I would say Traveling through Chile was amazing. In this way I can make a gerund and use it as a noun.
arizona
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