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I like dogs / I like dog?

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I like dogs / I like dog?

Unread postby cyphever1 » Sat Sep 30, 2006 2:27 pm

Does it really matter whether plural is used?
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Unread postby SwissCheese » Sun Oct 15, 2006 12:12 pm

As far as this single example is concerned it seems to matter. I personally would not say "I like dog".
I would rather say "I like dogs" or "I like this dog".
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Unread postby odyssey » Mon Oct 16, 2006 4:53 pm

"I like dog" is possible. The sense it conveys is "I like dog-meat" or "I like to eat dog".

(Dog meaning dog-meat is uncountable.)

If this is not what you mean, you should say:

I like dogs
I like some dogs
I like your dogs
I like big dogs
etc

OR

I like this dog
I like my dog
I like every dog
I like the dog
etc

(Dog meaning the animal is countable. Thus, in this sense, "I like dog" is not English.)

http://www.englishclub.com/grammar/noun ... ntable.htm
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Doesn't matter

Unread postby meylenlau » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:02 pm

When you say, "I like dog." That means in your mind you have a figure of a dog, you don't care whatever dog it is , very general.But when you say," I like dogs". That means a variety of dogs appear in your mind.
The language you use convey your message.
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plurality for generalizations...

Unread postby eric_p_m » Sun Nov 26, 2006 7:44 am

Dear Meylenlau,

The type of generalization you are talking about grammatically requires plural usage. The type of distinguishing characteristic you are referring to reminds me of the differing definitions between the use of "fish" and "fishes". In general, "fish" is considered to be an uncountable noun, but if you are trying to distinguish multiple types of fish, which are different from each other, then you should utilize "fishes".

As far as "dog" and "dogs" go, I agree and hopefully reinforce Odyssey's previous lucid explanation for your further reference.


Sincerely,

Eric Paul Monroe

http://www.eric-tesol.com/
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Re: plurality for generalizations...

Unread postby meylenlau » Sun Nov 26, 2006 12:14 pm

eric_p_m wrote:Dear Meylenlau,

The type of generalization you are talking about grammatically requires plural usage. The type of distinguishing characteristic you are referring to reminds me of the differing definitions between the use of "fish" and "fishes". In general, "fish" is considered to be an uncountable noun, but if you are trying to distinguish multiple types of fish, which are different from each other, then you should utilize "fishes".

As far as "dog" and "dogs" go, I agree and hopefully reinforce Odyssey's previous lucid explanation for your further reference.


Sincerely,

Eric Paul Monroe

http://www.eric-tesol.com/
Thanks.
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Unread postby chackavak » Sun Dec 03, 2006 8:40 pm

"I like dogs" is correct, because when you're talking about something generally, you have to use the plural form of the noun, of course when it is a countable noun.
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