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using l1 in fl classroom

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using l1 in fl classroom

Unread postby dolaia » Sat Nov 08, 2008 6:28 pm

I want to know the effect of using l1 in fl class room is it good or bad :?:
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Re: using l1 in fl classroom

Unread postby Vin Diesel » Thu Dec 18, 2008 12:49 am

Sometimes it is good but sometimes not. It depends on what type of teaching you are trying to approach.
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Re: using l1 in fl classroom

Unread postby thepearl » Mon Feb 02, 2009 11:33 am

good
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Re: using l1 in fl classroom

Unread postby Heads Up Eng » Thu Mar 05, 2009 4:29 am

Using the mother tongue of the students can be helpful, especially when giving instructions or to promote comprehension on something difficult like grammar. But there are a lot of techniques that allow you to use solely English in the classroom. Demonstration, examples, and simple activities that build on one another are only a few ideas. You may want to consider the following, especially in the EFL classroom:

1. The classroom may be the only opportunity for students to practice English communicatively.
2. English only in the classroom helps students build problem-solving/intuitive skills. They learn how to listen for key words, link gestures to the words, and follow instructions. When it comes time to travel abroad, they are better equipped for success.
3. Unless the teacher is very, very fluent, he may translate incorrectly, miss nuance, or even get something entirely wrong.
4. It can be discouraging to the students. This is especially true if the teacher gives a translation whenever someone doesn't understand.
5. It can be frustrating. This is especially true if the teacher gives a translation as the students are working out the meaning on their own.

I rarely use Japanese in my classrooms, and rarely need to. However, it does take a bit of work to effectively and clearly explain ideas, set up activities, etc.

I hope these ideas help.
Chris Cotter
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Re: using l1 in fl classroom

Unread postby Heads Up Eng » Thu Mar 05, 2009 8:28 am

I found this article on Japanese in the EFL classroom. Very interesting and very long, and it contradicts what I just posted. Well worth a read, and definitely shows that valid arguments exist for both sides of the debate.

http://iteslj.org/Articles/Weschler-UsingL1.html
Chris Cotter
Free flashcards at: http://www.flashcardhub.com.
Just print and teach materials at: http://www.headsupenglish.com.
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Re: using l1 in fl classroom

Unread postby eric_p_m » Sat Mar 28, 2009 7:19 am

Dear Chris,

Regardless of whether you are or are not a native speaker of wherever you are teaching at, keep in mind that you are teaching language and the goal is to get your students communicating in the target language. Every time you open your mouth, English should be flooding your classroom. Motivate your students while modeling that language is just a medium of communication.

I believe that the most fundamental error foreign language teachers are making nowadays is communicating with their students in their native language: utilize the target language both in and out of your classroom and your students will thank you for it. Speak with your students in the target language in class and in the event you have an office, continue to speak with them in the target language.

Speaking in your students' native language reinforces the fact that you are teaching a "foreign" language and is a subject not to be taken seriously. Countries that have a high sense of nationalism tend to openly discriminate against anything that does not reflect the insides of their cultural box. Once you enlighten your students that the language they communicate in really doesn't matter, but rather the crucial element is that they express their ideas, they will be more open to the idea of speaking in the target language.

Drop by my on-line school when you have time. I would welcome the opportunity to talk with you.


Sincerely,
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