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ditransitive vs monotransitive

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ditransitive vs monotransitive

Unread postby Sabiha » Sun Sep 30, 2012 10:50 am

Hi,
I have met the following difficulties while analysing my corpus.
I have classified the following verb as ditransitive. Do you agree with me?
- Incremental benefits of quadrivalent vaccination do not have a large effect on the cost differential.

I have classified the following verbs as monotransitive. Do you agree with me?
- Costs were discounted at 3.5% per year.
-The annual number of unique warts episodes was estimated at about 156 000.



Best regards
Sabiha
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Re: ditransitive vs monotransitive

Unread postby RosalindaPerez » Sat Nov 17, 2012 11:45 am

Hi! :)

I agree that the verbs in the following are monotransitive (taking only one object) and in the passive form. (The doer is not indicated. But for purposes of this discussion, let's just say the subject is "they.")

Costs were discounted at 3.5% per year.
(If converted to the active form: They discounted the costs at 3.5% per year.)
Only one object: costs.

The annual number of unique warts episodes was estimated at about 156 000.
(If converted to the active form: They estimated the annual number of unique warts episodes at about 156,000.)
Only one object: annual number of unique warts episodes.

But I think the verb "have" in the "Incremental benefits...." sentence may be more complex transitive than it is ditransitive.

A complex transitive verb takes an object plus a complement or an adverbial. Examples:
He got Jenny upset.
(Subj verb direct obj complement)
Elaine laid the flowers on the table.
(Subj verb direct obj adverbial)

A ditransitive verb takes an indirect object and direct object as in the ff. example:
I gave Belinda some biscuits.
(Subj Verb Indirect Obj Dir Obj)
I gave some biscuits to Belinda.
(Subj Verb Dir Obj Indirect Obj)

Thus, in the following sentence, the labels could be:
Incremental benefits of... do not have a large effect on the cost differential.
Subject verb direct obj adverbial

Regards
Rosalinda Perez
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