World's premier FREE site for learners + teachers of English

Newspapers Vocabulary

article n. a text or piece of writing in a newspaper, magazine, news website, etc on any non-fiction subject
There's a great article on doing business in China in today's Washington Post.
broadsheetUK n. a large-format newspaper, especially one with reliable news reports and opinion pieces by qualified experts and experienced contributors - see tabloid
The New York Times is a daily broadsheet famous for its quality journalism.
censor n. a state official who can stop publication of articles they find morally or politically offensive - censorship n.
Articles that criticize the government don't get past the censor these days.
chequebook journalism n. the obtaining of exclusive rights to a story by payment of large sums of money
Why shouldn't a woman who was abused by some rich politician make some money from chequebook journalism?
correspondent n. a journalist who covers a particular topic (eg politics, foreign news, sports etc) for a newspaper or other news media
Jonathon's been a foreign correspondent for the BBC for many years, mostly in Asia.
critic n. a person who writes reviews of things like books, films, plays, food, wine etc
Bob Halliday was a great music and food critic who wrote reviews and special features for the Bangkok Post.
desk n. a department of a newspaper [eg: the travel desk]
Unless you've spent years following lots of different sports, you're not really qualified to take over a sports desk.
edit v. to check, modify and generally prepare written material for publication
If you've got an eye for detail and excellent written English, you could apply for a job editing newspaper articles.
editor n. 1 a person who edits 2 the head of a newspaper or newspaper department
If certain newspaper editors hadn't supported him, the president mightn't have been elected.
editorial n. an article written by the editor stating his opinion
Today's editorial says anyone guilty of massive wage theft should be jailed, especially top executives and billionaires.
exclusive rights n. legal permission for one newspaper only to publish a story
It'll be worth paying for the exclusive rights if we can get them for a reasonable amount.
feature n. a special or regular article in a newspaper, usually displayed prominently
On Saturdays the paper publishes special features on sports and sports stars.
front page n. the first page of a newspaper, usually carrying the day's most important story
Have you seen the headline on the front page of today's paper?
headline n. 1 the title at the top of an article 2 headlines the most important stories
Writing a catchy headline that grabs people's attention isn't as easy as it looks.
journalist n. a person employed to write articles for a newspaper - journalism n.
I've wanted to be a journalist ever since I was in school.
media n. the media all the means of mass communication (newspapers, TV, radio, websites, etc)
Why does the royal family get so much attention in the media?
news website n. a place on the Internet where news is reported, usually as written articles with supporting images and/or video footage
Some news websites are online versions of printed newspapers or broadcast news media, while others exist purely as websites.
opinion n. what a person thinks about a particular subject; a subjective point of view
Reporters aren't supposed to express their opinions unless they're writing a column or an opinion piece.
paper n. 1 thin, flexible material on which you can write or print something 2 a newspaper
The train used to be full of people reading the paper, but these days they just look at their smartphones.
sensationalism n. low-quality journalism with stories made more shocking or exciting to attract more readers - sensationalist adj.
News websites had trouble making money at first, so they used sensationalism to boost traffic and income.
story n. a news article or report
Who wrote that story on the next World Cup in today's paper?
tabloid n. a small-format newspaper, especially one with sensationalist stories - see broadsheet
Tabloids are smaller than broadsheets, so the pages are easier to turn.