Origin of the New Year’s Celebration

Happy New Year

Pre-listening vocabulary

  • celebrate: to honour a holiday with a party or ceremony
  • festive: cheerful and exciting, especially because of a holiday
  • resolution: a goal for the new year
  • improve: to become better in some way
  • take place: to happen
  • introduce: to put something new into use

Listening activity

Gapfill exercise

The Origin of the New Year’s Celebration

Today, New Year’s is a festive holiday celebrated all the world. The tradition began 4,000 years ago in ancient Mesopotamia, where the people celebrated each year with an 11-day . Even back then, people made New Year’s resolutions. They believed that making to improve themselves helped to make sure the gods would stay with the kingdom. During that time, the celebration took place in March, but a new was introduced over 1,000 years later in Ancient Rome. Since then, New Year’s has mostly been celebrated on January 1st.

Comprehension questions

1. The tradition of celebrating New Year's began

Correct! Wrong!

The tradition of celebrating New Year's began 4,000 years ago.

2. The people of ancient Mesopotamia made resolutions because

Correct! Wrong!

The people of ancient Mesopotamia made resolutions because they wanted to make the gods happy.

3. Originally, the New Year's celebration took place in

Correct! Wrong!

Originally, the New Year's celebration took place in March.

Discussion/essay questions

  1. Do you have any resolutions this year? How do you plan to achieve them?

Transcript

The Origin of the New Year’s Celebration
Today, New Year’s is a festive holiday celebrated all around the world. The tradition began 4,000 years ago in ancient Mesopotamia, where the people celebrated each year with an 11-day festival. Even back then, people made New Year’s resolutions. They believed that making promises to improve themselves helped to make sure the gods would stay happy with the kingdom. During that time, the celebration took place in March, but a new calendar was introduced over 1,000 years later in Ancient Rome. Since then, New Year’s has mostly been celebrated on January 1st.

Written and recorded by Jaksyn Peacock for EnglishClub

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