photo Tara Benwell Listen to News with Tara Benwell - Instructions:
1. Preview the vocabulary and read the gapfill text.
2. Play the news report and try to fill in the blanks.
3. Answer the comprehension questions by writing full sentences.
4. Use the discussion question to write an essay or discuss the story with other students.
5. Click "show Answers" to see the full text.
6. Pretend to be a news anchor by reading each story out loud.

dateline: 26 July 2017

British Parents Give Up Legal Battle to Move Baby Charlie

Pre-Listening Vocabulary

  • controversial: causing disagreement
  • terminally ill: having an illness or disease that is expected to cause death
  • rare: not common
  • opposed: against
  • life support: equipment that keeps a person alive when his or her organs can’t function on their own
  • neurologist: a doctor that specializes in the brain and central nervous system
  • MRI: magnetic resonance imaging, a scan that looks inside organs and tissues
  • hospice: a home-like facility for very sick or terminally ill people

British Parents Give Up Fight to Move Baby Charlie

A British couple has given up a controversial fight to take terminally ill baby to the US for experimental treatment. Charlie Gard, an eleven-month-old, has a rare that makes it impossible for him to breathe on his own. Doctors in London were opposed to the idea of Charlie to New York and felt that he could experience unnecessary suffering. The European Human Rights Court recently that Charlie’s doctors had a right to remove him from life support. The American neurologist who had offered to treat Charlie this week after seeing a more recent MRI. Charlie will now be moved to a nearby hospice to spend the remainder of his life.

Comprehension Questions

  1. What did Charlie Gard’s parents want to do?
  2. Why were doctors in London opposed to his parents’ wishes?
  3. Why did an American neurologist change his mind about treating Charlie?

Discussion Questions: Earlier this month, the Pope supported Charlie’s parents, saying life support should not be turned off on the child. How do you feel about using life support to prolong a person’s life?

show Answers

Written by Tara Benwell for EnglishClub
Tara Benwell is a Canadian freelance writer and editor who specializes in materials and articles for the ELT industry.

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