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An English Breakfast Is A Full Breakfast

English breakfast

Interesting Facts in Easy English

Pre-Listening Vocabulary

  • continent: a large region of the world with various countries; or the mainland of a region as opposed to its islands
  • full-bodied: strong
  • croissant: a flaky, crescent-shaped French pastry
  • waffle: a crisp breakfast cake made from batter and served with butter and sweet toppings, such as syrup or fruit

An English Breakfast Is A Full Breakfast

The term “continental breakfast” originally a light morning meal served on the European continent. It consisted of coffee or tea as well as a croissant or other light snack, as opposed to the full “English breakfast” that was served in Britain. A traditional English breakfast includes hot food, such as eggs, breakfast meat, potatoes, beans, pudding and tea. Today, the term “continental breakfast” is commonly used in hotels throughout and other English-speaking countries. Hotels that advertise a continental breakfast typically offer breakfast that inside the price of the hotel. A continental breakfast at a North American hotel is typically self-serve. It may complimentary coffee, tea and muffins to a full buffet of eggs, bacon, sausages, pancakes, waffles, cereal and fresh fruit. In North America, the term “English Breakfast” is typically a traditional blend of full-bodied black tea served with milk and sugar.

Comprehension Questions

  1. Originally, how did an English breakfast differ from a continental breakfast?
  2. What might a hotel serve for a continental breakfast in North America?
  3. What does the term “English Breakfast” typically refer to in North America?

Discussion Questions: Do you think it’s important to start your day with a full breakfast, or are you more inclined to have a light breakfast and a large lunch or dinner/supper? Which is your most important meal of the day, and why?

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