Search found 64 matches

by ETutor
Fri Sep 02, 2011 12:23 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: How to say "is no more good" ("at" or "in")?
Replies: 5
Views: 5910

Re: How to say "is no more good" ("at" or "in")?

To lose one's touch means that you no longer have the ability to do something well.
e.g I have lost my touch at cooking.

Hope that helps!
by ETutor
Tue May 18, 2010 8:18 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: American idiom for ' talking very far away from the topic'
Replies: 2
Views: 2675

Re: American idiom for ' talking very far away from the topic'

Here are some other ways to say it: A true idiom: “Now this conversation has gone off on a tangent.” You could also say “I digress.” or “Now we are off topic.” --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- I love being a private ESL T...
by ETutor
Sun Apr 25, 2010 2:38 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: paragraph regarding inconvenience
Replies: 2
Views: 8645

Re: paragraph regarding inconvenience

Grammatically, the paragraph is correct. Here is a suggestion on how to word it: We understand that you may have difficulty rearranging your schedule to accommodate our invitation. We are very sorry for any inconvenience it may cause you and we appreciate your flexibility. --------------------------...
by ETutor
Sun Apr 25, 2010 2:37 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: A termite contains 36 mg of iron
Replies: 2
Views: 1890

Re: A termite contains 36 mg of iron

Here is another suggestion on how to say it: A termite contains 36 mg of iron compared to the only 4 mg contained in beef. In addition you might want to include some kind of base measure. Is it 36 mg per gram of termite/beef? As I doubt one termite has more iron than a whole cow. One could say: A gr...
by ETutor
Sun Apr 11, 2010 4:10 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: past tense
Replies: 1
Views: 1012

Re: past tense

This sentence is correct. Very nice. You may want to consider the use of pronouns in this sentence as it could be unclear who “his” and “he” are referring to (I assume they do not refer back to Dr. John). Also, the word “attend” could optionally be changed to “undergo”. You could say something like:...
by ETutor
Sun Apr 11, 2010 12:09 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: verbs with problem
Replies: 2
Views: 2747

Re: verbs with problem

The best words to use here would be “created” or “caused”. You would say: “you created this problem. This is your fault.” Or “The Bush administration caused a lot of the problems we are faced with today”. I hope this is helpful. -----------------------------------------------------------------------...
by ETutor
Wed Mar 31, 2010 9:11 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: out there
Replies: 1
Views: 1898

Re: out there

The expression “Out There” is commonly used to when you are referring to all that is available, as in “I would like to know what kind of technology is out there before I decide on one”. Also, you could use the expression, “out there” to describe something that you find crazy or very different. One e...
by ETutor
Wed Mar 10, 2010 7:16 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: What does this quotation mean?
Replies: 2
Views: 1565

Re: What does this quotation mean?

An interesting quote! On the surface it seems to not make sense. Because it appeared in a section titled “funny quotes” I believe it is meant to be funny. The speaker is saying that he does not read a book before he writes a review on it. He is saying that reading the book first would influence his ...
by ETutor
Tue Feb 16, 2010 7:41 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: also
Replies: 2
Views: 1448

Re: also

I think the way you have it written here, you should include the “to” before “retell”. Although, it would not be incorrect to omit the word “to” from the sentence, it sounds better to have it in there. Here are some other ways you could write it: He asked me to read, translate and also retell the ar...
by ETutor
Tue Feb 16, 2010 7:34 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: sentence construction help
Replies: 3
Views: 1535

Re: sentence construction help

The version with “weren’t” and “had just have lunch?” is not exactly correct. Here is how it would be written: We were not hungry. We had just had lunch. We weren’t hungry. We’d just had lunch. Here is another option for what you could put in those blanks: We were hungry, so we just had lunch. I hop...