Search found 44 matches

by TheStephen
Tue Jan 17, 2012 8:49 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Phrasal Verb - 'set off'
Replies: 2
Views: 3737

Re: Phrasal Verb - 'set off'

It has three main uses: 1. To denote a violent reaction of some sort, e.g. setting off a bomb, setting off a chemical reaction, setting someone off (making someone angry). 2. To show something as different, e.g. "His scar made set him off (or apart) from the rest of the group." 3. To say a journey h...
by TheStephen
Fri Dec 16, 2011 8:15 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Expressing actions with others and me in sentencing
Replies: 2
Views: 5247

Re: Expressing actions with others and me in sentencing

Is there ever a case when referring to others and yourself when you would reference yourself before the mentioning of others. As an example. If some one asked me, "who is going to be at the party?" Would you ever say,"Myself, Dick, Jane, and Kathy. As opposed to, "Kathy, Jane, Dick and myself. Or w...
by TheStephen
Fri Dec 09, 2011 11:26 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: 8 sentences - checking for any grammar errors
Replies: 2
Views: 2789

Re: 8 sentences - checking for any grammar errors

Here you are:

"I'm applying for my CCW license"

"in the middle of a road"

"the incident to the Sheriff's Department"

"Besides that, I'd like to apply"

"at City Hall"

"the situation doesn't enable it"
by TheStephen
Fri Dec 09, 2011 11:22 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: A vocabulary problem
Replies: 2
Views: 3572

Re: A vocabulary problem

Contains.
by TheStephen
Thu Dec 08, 2011 1:06 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: sick of a phrase... :-((
Replies: 2
Views: 2365

Re: sick of a phrase... :-((

For people: "You and I know that nobody is perfect."
or
"You and I know that no one is perfect."

For things: "You and I know that nothing is perfect."
by TheStephen
Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:01 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Help me with the sentence please..
Replies: 1
Views: 2145

Re: Help me with the sentence please..

"He knew the volume and page number for that theorem. It's similar to the one you had helped prove in 1922."

Does that help you?
by TheStephen
Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:27 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Is Saturday a holiday?
Replies: 16
Views: 20948

Re: Is Saturday a holiday?

They are simply "the weekend."
by TheStephen
Mon Nov 14, 2011 11:36 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: What does this sentence mean with "than"
Replies: 1
Views: 1992

Re: What does this sentence mean with "than"

Than is used to compare. In this case, we're comparing the amount people spent at restaurants with and without "dollar" indicated by the menu's prices. The text is saying that diners spent less money when the dollar sign was written with the price. They would spend less if the price of a meal were ...
by TheStephen
Sun Nov 06, 2011 3:05 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Something more?
Replies: 4
Views: 8641

Re: Something more?

Yes, but it does not mean the same as "something else." "Can you say something more?" is asking something to elaborate. It's like asking "Do you have more to say about this?"
by TheStephen
Thu Oct 27, 2011 8:51 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: How and why use "It has to be" in English.
Replies: 1
Views: 1779

Re: How and why use "It has to be" in English.

We use this structure to describe what must be, that something is required or necessary to be a certain way. A set of instructions for an essay (as an example) might read "It has to be 1500 words." It can also be used to convey disbelief: "Apparently that type of food isn't healthy." "What? It has t...
by TheStephen
Wed Oct 26, 2011 7:51 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: my writing about christmas tree~please help revise it !
Replies: 2
Views: 4253

Re: my writing about christmas tree~please help revise it !

Your English is very good! There weren't any major issues, just a few things here and there. "... when Germans took the fir trees home as decoration, which then came to be called Christmas tree." You must either place the article the before "Christmas tree" or pluralise it to Christmas trees . "Mart...
by TheStephen
Sat Oct 22, 2011 2:23 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: see vs watch a movie at a theatre
Replies: 3
Views: 13964

Re: see vs watch a movie at a theatre

Both are correct and widely in use.
by TheStephen
Tue Oct 18, 2011 8:30 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: A good soup?
Replies: 1
Views: 2798

Re: A good soup?

You can say that you're tasting a good bowl of soup, or that you're tasting some good soup, but you can't say that you're tasting a good soup.
by TheStephen
Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:39 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Question.
Replies: 6
Views: 4559

Re: Question.

In English, the school day in high or secondary school is generally divided into periods, not class. Thus, we say first period, second period, third period etc. When we say first class, second class, third class, etc. we're normally talking about socio-economic class, medals, awards, rank, degrees o...
by TheStephen
Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:24 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: What are the most important qualities of a leader?
Replies: 2
Views: 3840

Re: What are the most important qualities of a leader?

Do you want this corrected or critiqued for style at all?
by TheStephen
Wed Oct 12, 2011 7:42 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: I'm new to this forum
Replies: 9
Views: 6161

Re: I'm new to this forum

The edit button forsook me. :-(

My time limit had expired by the time I went to edit my teensy little error. Ahhhh well, such is life. :mrgreen:
by TheStephen
Tue Oct 11, 2011 10:04 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: feel well, feel good-any difference?
Replies: 3
Views: 4066

Re: feel well, feel good-any difference?

To feel good is a general phrase, but when an anglophone says they feel well, they're likely referring specifically to health.
by TheStephen
Mon Oct 10, 2011 5:27 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: is, am, are?
Replies: 8
Views: 12910

Re: is, am, are?

"Am" is correct, but "are" is also acceptable. Definitely not "is." Note that there are ways to avoid the problem altogether: "Father says that either you are to blame for the broken window or I am." "Father says that one of us is to blame for the broken window." "Father says that the blame for the ...
by TheStephen
Fri Oct 07, 2011 7:32 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Phrasal verbs = verb with same meaning
Replies: 2
Views: 2848

Re: Phrasal verbs = verb with same meaning

I'm not sure whether a single verb can always be found to replace a phrasal verb, but it is often the case.

Falling apart: collapsing, disintegrating, breaking, disattaching.

Working out: solving, examining, dissecting, figuring, calculating, computing.
by TheStephen
Fri Oct 07, 2011 7:27 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Haven't or didn't
Replies: 2
Views: 1862

Re: Haven't or didn't

Both! The first means that they haven't seen it lately over a period of time, while the second means that they didn't see it within a specific timeframe or at a specific place.
by TheStephen
Wed Oct 05, 2011 7:05 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: gold or golden?
Replies: 1
Views: 2299

Re: gold or golden?

Either one is correct. There is a lot of interchanging between gold and golden. You have to look at the context to know exactly what is meant.
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 30, 2011 7:57 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Which word is correct?
Replies: 1
Views: 2275

Re: Which word is correct?

I think there is a difference in meaning, though that difference may not exist in all anglophone regions. A tall building would rise high into the sky, while a high building would be built in an area on a high altitude.
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 30, 2011 7:52 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: A lot of or lots of?
Replies: 2
Views: 4511

Re: A lot of or lots of?

There is no difference in meaning, but there is a difference in formality. "A lot of" is informal and "lots of" is even more informal. "Much" and "many" are used in formal writing.
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 30, 2011 7:51 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: if you're in over your head on something
Replies: 3
Views: 3379

Re: if you're in over your head on something

There is no difference in meaning at all.
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 30, 2011 7:49 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: need some help to write a small text
Replies: 1
Views: 2042

Re: need some help to write a small text

First, you must research the subject to gain a good understanding of it and to support what you will say in the paper. Make sure the resources you use are reputable and that you record sources you found useful so you can return to them. Don't forget to cite all of the sources at the very end of the ...
by TheStephen
Mon Sep 26, 2011 7:27 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Between 'of the' & 'of'
Replies: 2
Views: 2958

Re: Between 'of the' & 'of'

You can equally say "The book's cover is torn."
by TheStephen
Sun Sep 25, 2011 8:00 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: happy person or merry person?
Replies: 5
Views: 5194

Re: happy person or merry person?

Thanks yourself! Any time.
by TheStephen
Sun Sep 25, 2011 7:58 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Need some help with letter writing!
Replies: 2
Views: 5050

Re: Need some help with letter writing!

I've been working hard lately so I don't have much spare time, but I finally decided to relax a little and go to the Warsaw cinema. My husband is coming too. Actually, going to the cinema was his idea. He also suggested going to a café afterwards. We could go to the Chocolate House. I know it's your...
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 23, 2011 7:17 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: happy person or merry person?
Replies: 5
Views: 5194

Re: happy person or merry person?

Most people say happy, though merry is also correct. There is, at least where I live, a subtle difference in meaning. Merry means obviously or visibly happy, like in the context of merriment at a party, where everyone is laughing and smiling and enjoying themselves. Happy is less specific. A merry p...
by TheStephen
Thu Sep 22, 2011 7:53 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: happy person or merry person?
Replies: 5
Views: 5194

Re: happy person or merry person?

Either is correct. :)
by TheStephen
Thu Sep 22, 2011 12:05 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: I'm new to this forum
Replies: 9
Views: 6161

Re: I'm new to this forum

You're quite welcome.

I just want to correct a mistake I made: the first sentence should read "half past five."
by TheStephen
Tue Sep 20, 2011 8:40 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: I'm new to this forum
Replies: 9
Views: 6161

Re: I'm new to this forum

It's quite easy to make sense of it, but it is still incorrect. A better way to write that would be with "hard," "difficult," or "too expensive" in its place. "Hardly" means much the same thing as "scarcely" or "barely," in a sense. "It was hardly half five in the morning when the alarm bell rang." ...
by TheStephen
Tue Sep 20, 2011 8:23 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: re check my cover letter and punctuation
Replies: 3
Views: 3937

Re: re check my cover letter and punctuation

It has been a pleasure to know you and your company, which I understand is a young and growing wine importer on the island. I heard from my husband Tino that finding the adequate personnel is very important for your business; because of this, I am enclosing my resume to this letter in case of a job...
by TheStephen
Tue Sep 20, 2011 8:09 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: "out of the question" and "out of question"
Replies: 2
Views: 3370

Re: "out of the question" and "out of question"

"Out of the question" means that something is unfavourable, out of consideration or wrong. "Placing gum under the desk is out of the question."

"Out of question" means unquestionable, certain or without a doubt. "It is out of question that Ryan is great at soccer."
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 16, 2011 8:06 pm
Forum: Creative Writing
Topic: Some of my Poetry
Replies: 9
Views: 6120

Re: Some of my Poetry

Thanks very much. I've been writing poetry since I was a young child, since it's part of the curriculum at school.
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 16, 2011 8:01 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: I'm new to this forum
Replies: 9
Views: 6161

Re: I'm new to this forum

All of the examples you listed use adjectives, not adverbs. The following, I think you would agree, are wrong:

"It is difficultly for me to handle."

"It is impossibly for dad to go there."

"It is hardly for ordinary middle class families to afford" is no different.
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 16, 2011 1:52 am
Forum: Creative Writing
Topic: Some of my Poetry
Replies: 9
Views: 6120

Re: Some of my Poetry

Thanks you. They are separate works, but I felt that it would be best to post them together rather than flood the board with multiple topics. :)
by TheStephen
Fri Sep 16, 2011 12:02 am
Forum: Creative Writing
Topic: Some of my Poetry
Replies: 9
Views: 6120

Some of my Poetry

I thought I would share some of my poetry with you. :) I love feedback, and would greatly appreciate anything you can think to contribute. Hopefully it isn't in poor taste that I share so many. :-? Some sonnets: Can innocence abide the crooked law Which floral memory is tainted by? Must roses, ever ...
by TheStephen
Thu Sep 15, 2011 11:18 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Is anything wrong in ( or with ) this sentence?
Replies: 1
Views: 2356

Re: Is anything wrong in ( or with ) this sentence?

The difference is rather small. It's almost a moot point, really. The first sentence is asking if there are any specific mistakes or problems within the sentence, while the second is asking whether there is anything wrong with the overall sentence itself. You would receive the same answer no matter ...
by TheStephen
Thu Sep 15, 2011 10:49 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Combining Sentences
Replies: 1
Views: 2674

Re: Combining Sentences

The first one is good.

"We will let you know about our decision."

All three of those are correct.

"Bill and Andy started making films after college."
by TheStephen
Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:50 pm
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: no bigger than
Replies: 2
Views: 1786

Re: no bigger than

TheStephen wrote:I don't think there's anything technically wrong with four, although it does sound a bit awkward. Two and three or more aesthetically pleasing.
I'd meant to say "are more."
by TheStephen
Thu Sep 15, 2011 12:34 am
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Hello!
Replies: 1
Views: 924

Hello!

I'm an anglophone from Canada. I've taken a huge interest in the past year or so in ESL students. I absolutely love discussing English, correcting and revising written work and discussing literature. Although I am by no legal means a teacher, I hope to employ some of my experience as a member of the...
by TheStephen
Thu Sep 15, 2011 12:07 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: coherent or consistent behavior
Replies: 2
Views: 2858

Re: coherent or consistent behavior

Consistent.
by TheStephen
Thu Sep 15, 2011 12:02 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: no bigger than
Replies: 2
Views: 1786

Re: no bigger than

I don't think there's anything technically wrong with four, although it does sound a bit awkward. Two and three or more aesthetically pleasing.