Search found 21 matches

by grammarguy
Sun Jul 15, 2018 3:06 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: sense your personality
Replies: 1
Views: 369

sense your personality

I have made up three similar sentences below. (1) Some people can sense others' personalities very easily. (2) Some people can sense the types of personalities others have. (3) Some people can sense the personalities others have. All of my non-native English speaking friends think my sentences all m...
by grammarguy
Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:41 pm
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: more snowfall expected .... be repulsed and abominated
Replies: 1
Views: 343

more snowfall expected .... be repulsed and abominated

I am going to make up a sentence below.

(ex) After three weeks of heavy snow, more snow expected to continue for two more weeks would be repulsed and abominated.

Does my sentence make sense? Thank you for your help.
by grammarguy
Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:37 pm
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: rainfall was coveted and valued
Replies: 1
Views: 346

rainfall was coveted and valued

I am going to make up a sentence below.

(ex) After three months of drought, the rainfall was coveted and valued.

Do the verbs in my sentence work? Thank you for your help.
by grammarguy
Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:00 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: (From) Monday to Wednesday or Monday through Wednesday
Replies: 1
Views: 314

(From) Monday to Wednesday or Monday through Wednesday

I have written down three sentences below. (1) Monday to Wednesday, I am available for three hours a day. (2) Monday through Wednesday, I am available for three hours a day. (3) From Monday to Wednesday, I am available for three hours a day. They all sound OK to my non-native English speaking friend...
by grammarguy
Fri Apr 13, 2018 8:50 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: time available or available time
Replies: 1
Views: 328

time available or available time

I am going to make up two sentences below.

(1) I will let you know when I will have more available time.

(2) I will let you know when I will have more time available.

I am not sure which one sounds natural to native English speakers. Thanks for your help.
by grammarguy
Tue Jan 16, 2018 7:35 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: join in vs join
Replies: 1
Views: 443

join in vs join

I am really confused about the difference between "join" and "join in". I am going to make up two pairs of sentences below. (1a) I would like to join you for lunch. (1b) I would like to join in the lunch next week. (2a) I would like to join my friends for your birthday party. (2b) May I join in your...
by grammarguy
Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:06 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: We each ate... vs We ate ... each
Replies: 1
Views: 489

We each ate... vs We ate ... each

I am going to make up two similar sentences below.

(1) We each ate two pieces of fruit at the party.

(2) We ate two pieces of fruit each at the party.

Does the placement of "each" change the meaning of the sentence? Thank you very much for your help.
by grammarguy
Fri Dec 29, 2017 6:52 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: hour(s) after hour(s)
Replies: 1
Views: 477

hour(s) after hour(s)

I am going to make up two similar sentences below. (1) You shouldn't spend hour after hour working on your project. You need to relax. (2) You shouldn't spend hour s after hour s working on your project. You need to relax. Do I need to pluralize "hour"? Please help me. Thank you for your help.
by grammarguy
Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:17 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: placement of "indefinitely"
Replies: 1
Views: 474

placement of "indefinitely"

I am going to make up two similar sentences below. (1) My boss will renew my contract indefinitely . (2) My boss will indefinitely renew my contract. I am sure that (1) is correct because adverbs are usually put at the end of the sentence. Is (2) both grammatically correct and idiomatic? Thanks for ...
by grammarguy
Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:16 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: I am confused about the grammar related to "in different ways"?
Replies: 1
Views: 547

I am confused about the grammar related to "in different ways"?

I am going to make up two sentences with "in different ways" below. (1) You examine this issue in a very different way from I. (2) As an experienced retail manager, my uncle has different ways of dealing with customers from the less experienced assistant manager. My non-native English speaking frien...
by grammarguy
Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:07 am
Forum: Help Each Other with English
Topic: Does it make sense to say "PM shifts"?
Replies: 1
Views: 732

Does it make sense to say "PM shifts"?

My friend told me that he is working a PM shift five days a week. I believe he meant either an afternoon or an evening shift.

Is it correct to say "a PM shift"? Thanks for your help.
by grammarguy
Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:59 pm
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: with or without "how much"
Replies: 1
Views: 485

with or without "how much"

I am going to make up a sentence below.

(ex) The birthday cake costs more than (how much) I make in an hour.

As a non-native English speaker, I think the sentence sounds OK to me with or without "how much". I am not sure if I am right about that. Please give me your opinion. Thanks a lot.
by grammarguy
Fri Aug 18, 2017 7:52 pm
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: contribute to or towards
Replies: 1
Views: 406

contribute to or towards

I am going to make up a sentence below.

(ex) I want to contribute $500 to or towards the monthly rent.

Both prepositions are very similar. I am not sure which one fits better. Please help me. Thanks a lot.
by grammarguy
Fri Aug 04, 2017 2:07 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: an exception in the tense usage of "over/during/in"
Replies: 1
Views: 442

an exception in the tense usage of "over/during/in"

My non-native English speaking friends and I have learned that you have to use either the present perfect or the present perfect continuous when you talk about "over/during/in". The reason is that these prepositions refer to an event that happened in the past and continues until now. My friends' nei...
by grammarguy
Fri Aug 04, 2017 1:28 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: a "new" definition of to walk
Replies: 1
Views: 546

a "new" definition of to walk

According to the online dictionary Dictionary.com, one of the definitions of "to walk" is to proceed through, over, or upon at a moderate pace on foot. It gives the two examples below. (ex) walking London streets by night; walking the floor all night This is a "new" definition for me because you can...
by grammarguy
Sat Jul 29, 2017 4:37 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: usage of "to incite"
Replies: 1
Views: 577

usage of "to incite"

According to the online dictionary Cambridge Dictionary, to incite means to encourage someone to do or feel something unpleasant or violent. I am going to use it in a sentence. (ex) John's book about anti-feminism incited her to write an extremely critical review about it. Am I using the verb correc...
by grammarguy
Mon Jul 24, 2017 4:58 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: adverbs vividly, beautifully and creatively about my nephew
Replies: 1
Views: 556

adverbs vividly, beautifully and creatively about my nephew

My nephew is five years old and he has won a few art awards. His teacher says that he draws much better than her older students, who have been learning art for more than six years. I am going to make up a simple sentence about my nephew. (ex) My talented five-year-old nephew draws pictures vividly, ...
by grammarguy
Sun Jul 16, 2017 7:19 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: Class vs The class
Replies: 1
Views: 702

Class vs The class

I am going to write down two similar sentences below. (1) Class will resume in two weeks. (2) The class will resume in two weeks. In (1), there is no definite article. Does it mean "any" class will resume? In (2), does the definite article suggest that one specific class will resume? I've heard from...
by grammarguy
Tue Jul 11, 2017 6:48 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: from your school or from school
Replies: 1
Views: 603

from your school or from school

I am a little confused about when to use the possessive for the word "school". I am going to make up an example about it below. (ex) John usually gets a lot of math homework from the learning center but not much from school (or from his school). Because I am not a native English speaker, I cannot fi...
by grammarguy
Fri Jan 27, 2017 7:21 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: In the last few weeks, + the simple past
Replies: 1
Views: 844

In the last few weeks, + the simple past

My non-native English speaking friends and I learn English from each other. I made up an example and asked them to comment on it. They said that you have to use the present perfect when you refer to a time period with phrases like "in the last few weeks, in the last few months, in the last few years...
by grammarguy
Fri Jan 27, 2017 6:48 am
Forum: Grammar Help
Topic: Since + past perfect. Is it possible?
Replies: 1
Views: 695

Since + past perfect. Is it possible?

I've heard that you have to use the present perfect in the main clause when you use the word "since". All the examples I've read in dictionaries use this tense. I am going to make up my own example with "since" in the past perfect . my example: (ex) Since I lost my job ten months ago, I had been une...