A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

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A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by SitangCampus » Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:51 am

Yulin is the famous city of Guangxi, China, where dog meats are eaten on the Summer Solstice and many foreign dog lovers have staged protests in front of the embassies of China in their respective countries.

This morning the social media saw a messege going viral, in which it said a nurse of Yulin No. 1 People's Hospital was arrested by local police for murdering a doctor of the same hospital. It is rumored that a man reported to the police when he found something believed to be human body in the stuck sewage of his home, which is below the home rented by the nurse upstairs.

Recently due to much violence breaking out between patients and doctors, China has attached great importance to the punishment of offence aimed at hurting or killiing medics.

(The poster SitangCampus is currently based in Guangxi)

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:46 am

SitangCampus wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 3:51 am
Yulin is the famous city of Guangxi, China, where dog meats are eaten on the Summer Solstice and many foreign dog lovers have staged protests in front of the embassies of China in their respective countries.

This morning the social media saw a messege going viral, in which it said a nurse of Yulin No. 1 People's Hospital was arrested by local police for murdering a doctor of the same hospital. It is rumored that a man reported to the police when he found something believed to be human body in the stuck sewage of his home, which is below the home rented by the nurse upstairs.

Recently due to much violence breaking out between patients and doctors, China has attached great importance to the punishment of offence aimed at hurting or killiing medics.

(The poster SitangCampus is currently based in Guangxi)
Is the nurse female or male?
And the doctor?
No idea about motive?

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by SitangCampus » Wed Mar 25, 2020 1:29 am

Safari wrote:
Tue Mar 24, 2020 9:46 am

Is the nurse female or male?
And the doctor?
No idea about motive?
Unless stated otherwise, a nurse is a female and a doctor is a male.
I think it is also the common sense of people to know the above.
Perhaps in your country there are so many male nurses and female doctors in a hospital that you think it is necessary to make clarification?
Lastest progress of the case shows that this nurse has some (financial or sexual) affairs with this middle-aged doctor. The dismembering of his dead body was done by a nurse, how terrifying!
I think you can find more vivid description of this case from UK's dailymail or other similar tabloids.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Wed Mar 25, 2020 7:32 am

SitangCampus wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 1:29 am
Unless stated otherwise, a nurse is a female and a doctor is a male.
I think it is also the common sense of people to know the above.
Wow! Before you make broad statements like that you should be sure of your facts. We are talking English here, not Chinese. Such statements date you. I would also urge you to go to the USofA and make such a statement. You will be crucified. Even I, who am not one for political correctness, would never assume that a doctor is male and a nurse is female. Which century were you born into? :roll:

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by SitangCampus » Wed Mar 25, 2020 3:19 pm

Safari wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 7:32 am
SitangCampus wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 1:29 am
Unless stated otherwise, a nurse is a female and a doctor is a male.
I think it is also the common sense of people to know the above.
Wow! Before you make broad statements like that you should be sure of your facts. We are talking English here, not Chinese. Such statements date you. I would also urge you to go to the USofA and make such a statement. You will be crucified. Even I, who am not one for political correctness, would never assume that a doctor is male and a nurse is female. Which century were you born into? :roll:
Don't take offence, I just stated a fact only, but perhaps with a wrong tone. And I have asked you to make an introduction of the situation in your country (I am not sure where you are from, but of course you can keep it a secret) and of course there is culture and customs difference. But even in the TV dramas made by American stations, what I see is female nurses and male doctors. So I think I am justified to make my earlier statement.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by kuyapo » Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:21 pm

Safari:
I'm afraid you mistook SitangCampus' statement on the nurse's and doctor's genders. It is, as far as i can read, an objective answer to your previous question. Note the phrase "unless stated otherwise", which implies that the assignment of genders was for the purpose of clarifying the story and answering your question, not making a sweeping gender statement. I do not see any sense of gender bias in the statement, but i see slight inclination to make hasty judgment in your own statement ("Which century were you born into?"). That is understandable though, if you are very sensitive about these feminists vs. chauvinists issues. But please read carefully and reflect first before you make hasty comments, as it could arouse other gender-sensitive readers to join a potential but unnecessary forum battle.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:47 am

Thank you kuyapo for signing up to intervene in this thread. I'm afraid you got the wrong end of the stick.
kuyapo wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 9:21 pm
Note the phrase "unless stated otherwise", which implies that the assignment of genders was for the purpose of clarifying the story and answering your question
That's the whole point. There was NO "assigning of genders".

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:49 am

docs640.jpg
Source: https://www.statista.com/chart/14983/fe ... y-country/
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Last edited by Safari on Sat Mar 28, 2020 10:51 am, edited 9 times in total.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Thu Mar 26, 2020 7:58 am

SitangCampus wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 3:19 pm
Safari wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 7:32 am
SitangCampus wrote:
Wed Mar 25, 2020 1:29 am
Unless stated otherwise, a nurse is a female and a doctor is a male.
I think it is also the common sense of people to know the above.
Wow! Before you make broad statements like that you should be sure of your facts. We are talking English here, not Chinese. Such statements date you. I would also urge you to go to the USofA and make such a statement. You will be crucified. Even I, who am not one for political correctness, would never assume that a doctor is male and a nurse is female. Which century were you born into? :roll:
Don't take offence, I just stated a fact only, but perhaps with a wrong tone. And I have asked you to make an introduction of the situation in your country (I am not sure where you are from, but of course you can keep it a secret) and of course there is culture and customs difference. But even in the TV dramas made by American stations, what I see is female nurses and male doctors. So I think I am justified to make my earlier statement.
I agree that US soap operas probably do show a preponderance of female nurses and male doctors, and I even agree that that TENDS to be the case in reality (a historical reality that is gradually changing). But that is no reason to ASSUME this unfortunate bias holds true in this particular case where the genders might play a crucial role, and no reason to answer so cavalierly when someone asks a simple question for clarification. :evil:

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by kuyapo » Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:16 pm

Safari: Thanks for the response. But there is no wrong end of the stick. Just two ends, in much the same way as there is no absolute right or wrong argument in an issue, which seemingly has two ends but actually has none. What i see is that SitangCampus was simply telling you that, in his/her story about the killing, the nurse concerned was a female, and the doctor killed was a male. In that particular statement, i see neither gender bias nor intention to make a general statement about stereotyped gender roles. And whatever your take on the gender issue, it doesn't seem right to make a personally insulting statement like "In what century were you born?" Remember, this is not a debate forum where users are encouraged to troll. We are all here with a common goal of learning a language. I'd like to encourage you to avoid misinterpreting SitangCampus' statement about the genders of the nurse and doctor mentioned in the story, give him/her instead the benefit of a doubt, and focus on helping all the rest of us learn from your obvious experise in the English language. To be honest, i personally admire your fluency.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Sat Mar 28, 2020 3:17 am

kuyapo wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:16 pm
...SitangCampus was simply telling you that, in his/her story about the killing, the nurse concerned was a female, and the doctor killed was a male.
Please read the original post and story. There is no mention of gender. SitangCampus simply assumed that a nurse would be female and a doctor would be male.

I then asked a perfectly civil question about their gender.

I then received a high-handed response insulting my common sense ("it is also the common sense of people to know") and sarcastically casting aspersions on my country ("Perhaps in your country there are so many").

This is why I think you have the wrong end of the stick. The insults came from the OP

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Sat Mar 28, 2020 3:22 am

kuyapo wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:16 pm
To be honest, i personally admire your fluency.
Another assumption. For all you know I may be English mother-tongue.

But I thank you for your compliment, and am indeed relieved.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by SitangCampus » Sat Mar 28, 2020 8:44 am

Safari wrote:
Sat Mar 28, 2020 3:17 am
kuyapo wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:16 pm
...SitangCampus was simply telling you that, in his/her story about the killing, the nurse concerned was a female, and the doctor killed was a male.
Please read the original post and story. There is no mention of gender. SitangCampus simply assumed that a nurse would be female and a doctor would be male.

I then asked a perfectly civil question about their gender.

I then received a high-handed response insulting my common sense ("it is also the common sense of people to know") and sarcastically casting aspersions on my country ("Perhaps in your country there are so many").

This is why I think you have the wrong end of the stick. The insults came from the OP
Now I know why you were upset, but you should have known that my identity here is simply a learner of English, which is a foreign language to me. Do you remember the first time you said something you feel curious about but which is offensive in your early childhood whether your parents would fly into a rage? I thought their first reaction must have been like "wow, look at my boy, he is so smart! I think I have wasted my so many years of living as an adult." Then after this surprise they took pains to correct your wrong saying, right? My case here is no different and when I realized I have made an offence to you, I clearly expressed it and put it ahead of other things I was going to say, so there was nothing wrong in my sincerity to try and error.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Sat Mar 28, 2020 10:58 am

SitangCampus wrote:
Sat Mar 28, 2020 8:44 am
Safari wrote:
Sat Mar 28, 2020 3:17 am
kuyapo wrote:
Fri Mar 27, 2020 2:16 pm
...SitangCampus was simply telling you that, in his/her story about the killing, the nurse concerned was a female, and the doctor killed was a male.
Please read the original post and story. There is no mention of gender. SitangCampus simply assumed that a nurse would be female and a doctor would be male.

I then asked a perfectly civil question about their gender.

I then received a high-handed response insulting my common sense ("it is also the common sense of people to know") and sarcastically casting aspersions on my country ("Perhaps in your country there are so many").

This is why I think you have the wrong end of the stick. The insults came from the OP
Now I know why you were upset, but you should have known that my identity here is simply a learner of English, which is a foreign language to me. Do you remember the first time you said something you feel curious about but which is offensive in your early childhood whether your parents would fly into a rage? I thought their first reaction must have been like "wow, look at my boy, he is so smart! I think I have wasted my so many years of living as an adult." Then after this surprise they took pains to correct your wrong saying, right? My case here is no different and when I realized I have made an offence to you, I clearly expressed it and put it ahead of other things I was going to say, so there was nothing wrong in my sincerity to try and error.
Thank you SitangCampus and I think the air has been cleared. Pleased let us know the other things you were going to say ;-)

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by kuyapo » Sat Mar 28, 2020 7:25 pm

Safari and SitangCampus: I'm happy that you two have settled the issue. I'd just like to make a remark -- no offence intended to any party -- on the two statements of SitangCampus that Safari felt (or thought, rightly or wrongly) as offensive to him (Safari) that drew his reaction. Incidentally, Safari, please know that i read the original story before posting any remark here, just for your info. And I find that SitangCampus' omission of any gender assignment in the original post is in fact a reflection of the way he speaks as a Chinese (e.g.. same phonic pronoun for male and female).
Now, the two statements i refer to are:
(1) "I think it is also the common sense of people to know the above."
First, it is a well-established wisdom that "common sense" is not necessarily right. It is just a perception based on commonly held beliefs, beliefs that may not necessarily be right, true or valid. When we say "it is common sense", it does not particularly point to any individual's way of thinking but,rather, to a perception held by many, let's say a majority, of people.
Second, I don't believe that Safari is using common sense, as he thought SitangCampus was implying (SitangCampus didn't say "your common sense" but "the common sense of people"). I can see from Safari's posts that Safari is not using common sense but a highly intelligent deduction, albeit mixed with a negative emotion that I can now understand (based on SitangCampus revelation of your childhood experience). Safari may have said "my common sense" because he misinterpreted SitangCampus as referring specifically to him when he said "the common sense of people." I myself can validly say "I think it is also the common sense of people to know the above." because that is the common perception in my culture.
(2) "Perhaps in your country there are so many male nurses and female doctors in a hospital that you think it is necessary to make clarification?"
Unfortunately, Safari stopped the quote at "Perhaps in your country there are so many". From my meager knowledge of the Chinese linguistic custom, SitangCampus' statement is a polite way of making an assumptive statement -- Chinese-wise. Most Chinese people i know try as much as possible to offend people with their words. Unfortunately, SitangCampus is not a native English speaker, so his English statement, patterned somewhat from Chinese construction, can be easily misconstrued as offensive by a non-Chinese reader, especially if the focus stopped on the beginning phrase, as Safari seems to have done. Myself, i wouldn't take offense on SitangCampus' statement. Just a clarification.
Anyway, I'm happy that you two have finally made things clear, and i hope my remarks (for whatever they're worth) have added to the clarification. It is quite of interest how learning a foreign language, and the resulting exchange between two people of different linguistic cultures, can sometimes lead to misunderstanding. But that is what this EnglishClub forum is all about: not to divide, but to unite people of differing cultures but who have a common goal of learning and improving their language. I know that Safari, with his excellent command of English, can do a lot to help non-native English learners like SitangCampus and me (or "i"?). Just try to avoid letting our emotions come into play.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by SitangCampus » Sun Mar 29, 2020 3:53 am

@kuyapo: Thanks for your understanding, were you also a learner of English before you can use this language so well? And it is interesting to know you have many Chinese contacts. We have such a lesson named Cross-culture Communication opened in colleges of China, but mainly for those students who take foreign languages (mainly English) as their major. But as far as I know, even the lectures of the course do not know what culture difference is if they do not have the real experience like this between me and @safari. You are welcome to share with us more because your writing is marvellous.

@safari You know that in chat there is not really a topic, we can talk about anything that comes into mind, so when you asked me what I am going to say, earlier I have a clear idea, but due to your distraction, I have completely forgotten it. But whatever, I still use English for communication, that is the most important part of what I am doing. If you are a real native speaker of English, I believe you must be someone who wishes to give a hand here in the forum, because it is absurd for you to learn something of English here. So you may give us more words about yourself and share more about your life experience. By the way, May 12, the day when Wenchuan earthquake took place in 2008, has been made the memorial day of disaster of China and it was coincidentally the day of nursing workers of China before that. The same memorial day observed in Europe and America is Nightingale Day (I don't remember very well, but it shows the day is for a great lady who acted as a nurse in World War One.) so you see, once again I have the evidence to support my arguement that a nurse, without further explanation, is a female to many of people in China and elsewhere.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Sun Mar 29, 2020 4:40 am

“Common sense is the most widely shared commodity in the world, for every man is convinced that he is well supplied with it.”
- Rene Descartes

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Sun Mar 29, 2020 4:43 am

kuyapo wrote:
Sat Mar 28, 2020 7:25 pm
can do a lot to help non-native English learners like SitangCampus and me (or "i"?).
me

help people like me

help people like SC and me

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by kuyapo » Sun Mar 29, 2020 9:47 pm

Sitang: Thanks for the compliment and the "invite", but i'm afraid you over-rated me. Not so fluent in English -- whenever i write (which is the best i can do), i feel like a Covid patient gasping for air. As a learner like me, you'd do well to keep on writing and writing -- diligent practice is the only way to hone in a foreign language. As for Chinese "contacts", i'm afraid there are not too many, just a few (including you, i hope). Just naturally interested in, among others, cross-cultural studies, and even there my knowledge is meager. But i have Chinese roots (Fujian) and partly Chinese environment. I'll be very interested in your giving us "tidbits" about Chinese life and culture, because i believe that is where you are an authority. (Just a thought about nurses: I admire Florence Nightingale. She has the stereotyped strength and fortitude of a man and the warm caring of a mother for her sick child. I may also say the same for all the nurses and other health workers who are now risking their own health and lives as they care to Covid patients around the world. Perhaps, your Chinese government should give back May 12 to nurses, they are worth more than any earthquake in the world.)
Safari: Thanks for the tip on "me" and "i" -- it's been a source of so much controversy among our English teachers here. And i like that quote from Descartes -- it really tells so much more than what it says. Thinking back on our earlier discussion, can there really be a term as "MY common sense"? Common sense is a shared thinking, i doubt if it can be attributed to any individual, mainly because that would defeat the very meaning of "common." Oh, well, just a crazy thought.
Be safe, you two and all other possible readers.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by SitangCampus » Mon Mar 30, 2020 1:37 am

@kuyapo: haha, I notice you have changed your id from a teacher to a learner of English, please don't be pressurized. I highly respect teachers, though they often learn from their students, but it is an honorable job, admit it. I wish I could be one to help others too. If it is not too personal, from the info you provide, I guess you are based in Southeast Asia in general, the Philippines in particular. Just a random guess to have fun. You must have done a lot of reading in your spare time, you know many things. You should not have said you are a patient of Covid-19, it is not good to put yourself in such a scenario, let us hope the best especially at this time of uncertainty worldwide. Regarding "common sense", I remember there is a book written by the founding father of the US with the same title, but it reads like a book from heaven, a term to illustrate a very difficult one to understand in Chinese expression. Perhaps you can talk about it next time.

@Safari: you always keep your terse style, which saves words and leaves much to be expected. I really appreciate it if you can say a little more about you or any other things, which would interest us all.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by Safari » Thu Apr 02, 2020 8:50 am

Nurse killed doctor girlfriend "because he thought she gave him coronavirus"

https://metro.co.uk/2020/04/02/nurse-ki ... -12496303/

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by SitangCampus » Fri Apr 03, 2020 7:56 am

In China, there are now working in the hospital some men whose job is like that of nurses, but they are not included in the real or regualr workforce of the hospital and they are treated as workmen, who are lower than nurses in payment and status.

There are also some serving as babysitters (well, this may not be the correct word, but I think you know what I mean, or sick-sitter if my coinage is OK), who are paid on daily basis by the family or relatives of the sick person who gets the care of the sick sitter. They live a very hard life, having no decent place to rest, eat and have a shower, sharing everything with the sick man they care in the small, often shared cell. Sometimes they have to sleep in the corridor on a makeshift bed that they rent from the hospital for 10 yuan per night. When the sick man recovers and checks out, they will have to find a new customer on the same floor of the hospital, or they will lose job. They often have two or three or no jobs at hand for this reason.

In the current battle against Covid-19, the medical staff who offer help to Wuhan are from public-funded hospitals or research institutes from the rest of China. Private hospitals just sit aside doing nothing, but one of them in Wuhan even secretly asked for the hard-earned face masks from the donated source, causing great anger in the people when exposed by social media.

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Re: A Nurse Killed A Doctor in Yulin

Post by kuyapo » Fri Apr 03, 2020 2:03 pm

When Nature strikes back at man, as in the current pandemic, it seems to spare neither rich nor poor. Human societies behave differently though. Governments and most organizations devoted to human welfare publicly commit their efforts towards helping the least privileged, notably the poor. In practice, however, it is the poor who suffer most from policies supposedly meant to protect the general public. For example, in our country, the government imposed lockdowns (euphemistically called " enhanced community quarantine"), banned ALL public transport, and closed all non-essential businesses and social activities in a belated effort to stem the spread of the viral contagion. These, it did after deciding earlier - for political reasons - not to stop the entry of foreigners who could be potential carriers of the virus. The late measures are supposed to equally affect everyone, but they did not.
The ban on public transport, while allowing the car-owning rich to move around almost freely, saddled the poor two ways: (1) Drivers of public transport, almost all of whom are poor, lost their only means of livelihood, with no other means of relief available to most professionals, business persons and salaried employees of large companies. (2) The people who have no cars of their own and who rely heavily on public transport suddenly have to walk distances, if they are allowed to go out at all, to go about their essential activities, such as buying necessities and selling wares in the streets and public markets.
The overly propagandized drive to provide relief goods to the poor has run into political and self-serving problems. There have been reports of the goods not reaching their intended beneficiaries, but going instead to favored parties and relatives of local (community) leaders. One city mayor, who received high public marks for his prompt relief of his constituents, suddenly got investigated by the national government simply because someone suggested he could have been an ideal person as future president. Another, a national leader but an oppositionist, is being threatened of being prosecuted for privately helping health workers and other distressed citizens.
Disasters and calamities provide an opportunity for the more fortunate people to reach out and help the less fortunate ones. Alas, they also allow others to exploit the situation for self- and group-serving ends. The dangerous and low-paying jobs told to us by SitangCampus may appear to some as an opportunity for the jobless to earn a living, though a temporary one. But they also tell us how society mistreats those who have poor "connections" and less privileges because of their position in life. Technology and education may have changed the world for - hopefully - the better, but they have not changed human nature at all. We are still good when we choose to be, and evil when we choose our own over others. At least, there is that other kind of Nature which, though sometimes providential but sometimes also cruel, does not discriminate between rich and poor.

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