year/years usage question

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siso
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year/years usage question

Post by siso » Sun Apr 03, 2005 6:38 am

Hello,
I've read some books and articles, and I got confuse with year or years usage. There are some sentences: 35-year old women, 35-years old, five years experience.
Which one is correct, year or years?
Thanks a lot and regards,

sis

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GiddyGad
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Re: year/years usage question

Post by GiddyGad » Mon Apr 04, 2005 7:21 am

sis wrote
siso wrote:...I got confused with year or years usage. There are some sentences: 35-year old women, 35-years old, five years experience.
Which one is correct, year or years?
Thanks a lot and regards,
35-year old women = two thousand four colour two by one meter posters - '35-year old' is an attribute, just like 'four colour' and 'two by one meter'...
...are you sure the '-' is necessary?;

35 years old = '6 feet tall' - like '5 books to read', 'two walls whitewashed with two left for tomorrow' etc. 'Years' here is a countable noun.

a five years' experience = an experience of five years = a five miles' distance; a two weeks' leave - 'years' is a countable noun in the possessive case.

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Re: year/years usage question

Post by Guest » Mon Apr 04, 2005 10:04 pm

GiddyGad wrote:sis wrote
siso wrote:...I got confused with year or years usage. There are some sentences: 35-year old women, 35-years old, five years experience.
Which one is correct, year or years?
Thanks a lot and regards,
35-year old women = two thousand four colour two by one meter posters - '35-year old' is an attribute, just like 'four colour' and 'two by one meter'...
...are you sure the '-' is necessary?;
It's a 35 year-old woman.

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GiddyGad
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Re: year/years usage question

Post by GiddyGad » Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:26 am

simplyblessedwithlove wrote:It's 35 year-old women.
Oops. Me, I wouldn't use a dash here at all. And the parallel examples show it's redundant. How come this one to be here when in other cases it isn't?.. Maybe, another stupid rule...

...I would even think that 'year' and 'old' combined with a dash could render the meaning of '35 women a year old each'...

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Re: year/years usage question

Post by Guest » Tue Apr 05, 2005 5:11 pm

GiddyGad wrote:
simplyblessedwithlove wrote:It's 35 year-old women.
Oops. Me, I wouldn't use a dash here at all. And the parallel examples show it's redundant. How come this one to be here when in other cases it isn't?.. Maybe, another stupid rule...

...I would even think that 'year' and 'old' combined with a dash could render the meaning of '35 women a year old each'...
I'm a 35 year-old lady.
I'm 35 years old.

I don't know how to explain it right now. Let me look at the rules again. I just know it's how it's supposed to write. :oops: Quite embarrassing to say that sometimes I really don't try to understand English's rules. :oops: :oops: :oops:

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GiddyGad
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Re: year/years usage question

Post by GiddyGad » Tue Apr 05, 2005 5:30 pm

simplyblessedwithlove wrote:I'm a 35 year-old lady.
I'm 35 years old.

I don't know how to explain it right now. Let me look at the rules again. I just know it's how it's supposed to write. :oops: Quite embarrassing to say that sometimes I really don't try to understand English's rules. :oops: :oops: :oops:
Probably you're right here.

Me, I can't remember things I don't understand. Understanding may be not only logical - emotional, perceptive, and aesthetic as well, mind you. ;)

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Pirate
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Post by Pirate » Tue Apr 05, 2005 8:34 pm

It is 35-year-old lady.

"35-year-old" is used as an adjective. View more here if you like:
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/compounds.htm

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Post by GiddyGad » Wed Apr 06, 2005 8:42 am

pirate wrote:It is 35-year-old lady.

"35-year-old" is used as an adjective. View more here if you like:
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/compounds.htm
Hmm... :roll: This does make sense. Thanks for the trouble.

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Post by Guest » Wed Apr 06, 2005 3:50 pm

pirate wrote:It is 35-year-old lady.

"35-year-old" is used as an adjective. View more here if you like:
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/compounds.htm
Based on the rule link that you provided,
With a series of nearly identical compounds, we sometimes delay the final term of the final term until the last instance, allowing the hyphen to act as a kind of place holder.....

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Post by Guest » Wed Apr 06, 2005 6:04 pm

pirate wrote:It is 35-year-old lady.

"35-year-old" is used as an adjective. View more here if you like:
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/compounds.htm
Well well well, just checking around and this could be right but you're missing an A right there. It has to be,
I'm A 35-year-old lady.
or
I'm A 35 year-old lady.
Either way is correct.

siso
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Thanks

Post by siso » Thu Apr 14, 2005 10:29 am

Thanks a lot for all reply.

Regards,

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Pirate
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Post by Pirate » Thu Apr 14, 2005 10:08 pm

simplyblessedwithlove wrote:
pirate wrote:It is 35-year-old lady.

"35-year-old" is used as an adjective. View more here if you like:
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar/compounds.htm
Well well well, just checking around and this could be right but you're missing an A right there. It has to be,
I'm A 35-year-old lady.
or
I'm A 35 year-old lady.
Either way is correct.
Yeah, sorry for the "a".

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