presume / assume

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mnytii
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presume / assume

Post by mnytii » Fri Jan 23, 2009 9:41 am

i'm rather confused about their usage. how will you know when to use presume or assume in a sentence? thanks in advance again! :-)

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denvinbo
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Re: presume / assume

Post by denvinbo » Sat Jan 24, 2009 4:01 am

Presume

Verb (used with object)

+ to take for granted, assume, or suppose
-I presume you're tired after your drive.

+ Law . to assume as true in the absence of proof to the contrary.

+ to undertake with unwarrantable boldness.

+ to undertake (to do something) without right or permission
-to presume to speak for another.

Verb (used without object)

+ to take something for granted; suppose.

+ to act or proceed with unwarrantable or impertinent boldness.

+ to go too far in acting unwarrantably or in taking liberties (usually fol. by on or upon )
-Do not presume upon his tolerance.


Assume


+ to take for granted or without proof; suppose; postulate; posit
-to assume that everyone wants peace.

+ to take upon oneself; undertake
-to assume an obligation.

+ to take over the duties or responsibilities of
-to assume the office of treasurer.

+ to take on (a particular character, quality, mode of life, etc.); adopt
-He assumed the style of an aggressive go-getter.

+ to take on; be invested or endowed with
-The situation assumed a threatening character.

+ to pretend to have or be; feign
-to assume a humble manner.

+ to appropriate or arrogate; seize; usurp
-to assume a right to oneself; to assume control.

+ to take upon oneself (the debts or obligations of another).

+ Archaic . to take into relation or association; adopt.

Verb (used without object)

+ to take something for granted; presume.
Hey! I'm stuck! Get me out!

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Joe
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Re: presume / assume

Post by Joe » Sat Jan 24, 2009 8:38 am

Check out this simple explanation:
http://eslblogs.englishclub.com/english ... or-assume/

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denvinbo
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Re: presume / assume

Post by denvinbo » Sat Jan 24, 2009 1:28 pm

wow! It's easy to understand.... {-: {-:
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Colee
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Re: presume / assume

Post by Colee » Fri Apr 17, 2020 8:30 pm

I know I'm a bit late, but I wanted to reply so it can be understood in a simple manner. Both of these words are different but there's a fine line between them. Both of the words mean believing in something before it happens, but you use the word assume when you are not totally sure of the end result. I hope this short explanation helps others and if not there always links to research it online.
Cheers! :D

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