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on and onto

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bringit
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Joined: Tue Mar 29, 2016 4:29 am
Status: English Learner

on and onto

Post by bringit » Tue Mar 29, 2016 4:38 am

In the sentence 'She jumped on bed and fell off it last night. Today she had back pain.', what is actually the meaning of 'jumped on', is it she jumped from the floor to the bed or she jumped up and down on the bed?
I think it is almost impossible to fall when she just jumped up and down on the bed.
But I don't know, because 'jumped onto' should be used for the second meaning.

knowable
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Posts: 43
Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2016 5:31 pm
Status: English Teacher

Re: on and onto

Post by knowable » Thu Apr 07, 2016 12:56 pm

I would say either on or onto is okay because we are talking about movement here.

From the sentence, I understand that the person was one moment on it and the next off it. And in course of that movement the person hurt their back. But I do not think the writer meant that the person was jumping up and down on the bed.
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