Non-finite clauses

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LeaJenny
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Non-finite clauses

Post by LeaJenny » Fri May 08, 2020 12:28 am

Can you help me with these sentences, please?
Which is (in)correct?

a. Having been eating our lunch, the rain stopped.
b. Having eaten our lunch, the rain stopped.
c. Having eaten our lunch, we decided to go for a walk.
d. Having eating our lunch, we went out for a walk.

I suppose d) is wrong (we cannot use ‘having eating’), c) seems to be OK, a) and b) is rather weird because it would appear the verb refers to ‘rain’, but put in context it could make sense (i.g. While... After...)?
Thank you. It is confusing for me.

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Joe
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Re: Non-finite clauses

Post by Joe » Fri May 08, 2020 2:09 am

LeaJenny wrote:
Fri May 08, 2020 12:28 am
Can you help me with these sentences, please?
Which is (in)correct?

a. Having been eating our lunch, the rain stopped.
b. Having eaten our lunch, the rain stopped.
c. Having eaten our lunch, we decided to go for a walk.
d. Having eating our lunch, we went out for a walk.

I suppose d) is wrong (we cannot use ‘having eating’), c) seems to be OK, a) and b) is rather weird because it would appear the verb refers to ‘rain’, but put in context it could make sense (i.g. While... After...)?
Thank you. It is confusing for me.
Your analysis is about right.

Let's assume the rain did not eat your lunch, so that rules a and b out.

d is not possible.

c is correct. :ok:

The construction "Having been eating..." (a) is possible in appropriate situations, for example:

Having been driving for five hours, he needed a rest.
"We are not wholly bad or good, who live our lives under Milk Wood :-| " — Dylan Thomas, Under Milk Wood

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