noun qualifies noun?

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peanutbutter
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noun qualifies noun?

Post by peanutbutter » Fri Feb 19, 2021 7:44 am

I am confused with the morphology in qualifying a head word. I found both usage of "education development" and "educational development" / "Education landscape" and "educational landscape"? Similarly, there are usage of "science and technology landscape" and "scientific and technological landscape"/ "Education trends" "Technology trends" / "educational trends"/"technological trends". I am trying to write something on reform and development in education, so for variation, should it be "education reform and development" or should it be "educational reform and development"? Please advise. Thank you.

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Alan
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Re: noun qualifies noun?

Post by Alan » Sat Feb 20, 2021 1:41 am

Most careful users would prefer to use a dedicated adjective (e.g. educational) where it exists, but essentially in this case it is optional.

Note, however, that apparent alternative forms of modifiers are not always exact synonyms (e.g. historic/historical, economic/economical).

Consult a dictionary if in doubt.

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