How an adjective complement can be a "noun clause"?

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Pexbex
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How an adjective complement can be a "noun clause"?

Post by Pexbex » Tue Jan 30, 2018 9:46 am

A noun clause acts as a substitution of noun phrase. For example :

I like the food. "The food" is object of the sentence.
I like what you have cooked. "What you have cooked" is a noun clause.


But who knows the function of this "that clause" if we accept it's function is a noun clause?

We are happy that you are here.

Why this that clause is a noun clause?

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Alan
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Re: How an adjective complement can be a "noun clause"?

Post by Alan » Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:40 am

A that-clause, depending on sentence-position, can function nominally, adjectivally or adverbially.

In the example you cite it is adverbial (i.e. not a noun clause), since it specifies WHY you are happy.

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