hang on/hold on

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Pacifist
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hang on/hold on

Post by Pacifist »

1. Assume that someone was lying on the ground injured



Would any of these expressions be appropriate to be used?



a) "Hang on. I'm going to call for help."


b) "Hold on. I'm going to call for help."



Note: I should emphasize that the person is lying on the ground, and is not hanging or holding anything.




2. Now, assume that I'm speaking to someone to get their help, would it be correct to say:



a) "Jim was still alert when I came, but he certainly won't hang on the whole time."


b) "Jim was still alert when I came, but he certainly won't hold on the whole time."



Note: Can those expressions be used, even if not in the imperative form.
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Alan
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Re: hang on/hold on

Post by Alan »

1. Yes, both possible.
2. Neither would be idiomatic, although you might say 'he won't be able to hang on (much longer)', or 'he won't be able to hold out (much longer)'.
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