What Are Your Favorite Quotations?

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illusion
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Postby illusion » Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:43 pm

"What a piece of work is man! How noble in reason! how infinite in faculties! in form and moving, how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension, how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me; no, nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so."


"Hamlet" by William Shakespeare

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Dixie
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Postby Dixie » Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:12 pm

illusion wrote:"What a piece of work is man! How noble in reason! how infinite in faculties! in form and moving, how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension, how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me; no, nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so."


"Hamlet" by William Shakespeare


I love a quotation from Hamlet. I will look for it.

EDIT: Can't find it! Anyway it's the one that starts with Gertrude saying something like: "Hamlet, you have thy father much offended"...

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Postby Bambang » Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:38 pm

Dixie wrote:
illusion wrote:"What a piece of work is man! How noble in reason! how infinite in faculties! in form and moving, how express and admirable! in action how like an angel! in apprehension, how like a god! the beauty of the world! the paragon of animals! And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me; no, nor woman neither, though by your smiling you seem to say so."


"Hamlet" by William Shakespeare


I love a quotation from Hamlet. I will look for it.



Once upon a time, there was a nice curious uncle. He wanted to know about Hamlet. Then he bought a DVD entitled "Hamlet". It contained 3 compact discs. Then he watched the movie. He almost cried in the middle of the movie. Not because of the story but .... he needed more than 4 hours to watch it through. Finally he just watched the first 20 minutes, then 20 minutes in the middle, and 10 minutes at the end.

After that he put the DVD under his cupboard in the hope that he would never find it.

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Dixie
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Postby Dixie » Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:41 pm

bambang wrote:Once upon a time, there was a nice curious uncle. He wanted to know about Hamlet. Then he bought a DVD entitled "Hamlet". It contained 3 compact discs. Then he watched the movie. He almost cried in the middle of the movie. Not because of the story but .... he needed more than 4 hours to watch it through. Finally he just watched the first 20 minutes, then 20 minutes in the middle, and 10 minutes at the end.

After that he put the DVD under his cupboard in the hope that he would never find it.


OH my dog! Please read the book.

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Postby Dixie » Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:43 pm

Found it!

Act 3, Scene 4

HAMLET

Now, mother, what's the matter?

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Hamlet, thou hast thy father much offended.

HAMLET

Mother, you have my father much offended.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Come, come, you answer with an idle tongue.

HAMLET

Go, go, you question with a wicked tongue.


I just loved this part. Note that when Gertrude says "thy father" she means Claudius, and when Hamlet says "my father" he means his real father.

source

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Postby Bambang » Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:49 pm

Dixie wrote:
bambang wrote:Once upon a time, there was a nice curious uncle. He wanted to know about Hamlet. Then he bought a DVD entitled "Hamlet". It contained 3 compact discs. Then he watched the movie. He almost cried in the middle of the movie. Not because of the story but .... he needed more than 4 hours to watch it through. Finally he just watched the first 20 minutes, then 20 minutes in the middle, and 10 minutes at the end.

After that he put the DVD under his cupboard in the hope that he would never find it.


OH my dog! Please read the book.



I don't even like dogs.

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Postby Dixie » Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:52 pm

bambang wrote:
I don't even like dogs.


How about books? ;)

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Postby Bambang » Sun Aug 19, 2007 4:31 am

Dixie wrote:
bambang wrote:
I don't even like dogs.


How about books? ;)



C'mon Dixie. I don't like books on dogs.

It's not Shakespeare's era any more.

It's Steven Spielberg's and Steven Hawking's.

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Postby illusion » Sun Aug 19, 2007 8:28 pm

Dixie wrote:Found it!

Act 3, Scene 4

HAMLET

Now, mother, what's the matter?

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Hamlet, thou hast thy father much offended.

HAMLET

Mother, you have my father much offended.

QUEEN GERTRUDE

Come, come, you answer with an idle tongue.

HAMLET

Go, go, you question with a wicked tongue.


I just loved this part. Note that when Gertrude says "thy father" she means Claudius, and when Hamlet says "my father" he means his real father.

source





yeah, I know what you mean. I've read Hamlet more than 10 times. I nearly know it by heart in English. It's the best tragedy that Shakespeare has ever created...I am so in love with Hamlet, his intelligence and wicked sense of humour. He was a very sensitive character and I couldn't stop crying when I read the scene of his death... "the rest is silence"

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Postby illusion » Sun Aug 19, 2007 8:35 pm

bambang wrote:
Dixie wrote:
bambang wrote:
I don't even like dogs.


How about books? ;)



C'mon Dixie. I don't like books on dogs.

It's not Shakespeare's era any more.

It's Steven Spielberg's and Steven Hawking's.



For Shame! Shakespeare's era was, is and will be forever because the truths contained in his works are immortal and despite the huge amount of time that has passed since he wrote, the things he wrote about and emotions he exposed are simply timeless!

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about ...Sheakspeare.

Postby LadyMacbeth » Sun Aug 19, 2007 9:00 pm

Hello :)

For Shame! Shakespeare's era was, is and will be forever because the truths contained in his works are immortal and despite the huge amount of time that has passed since he wrote, the things he wrote about and emotions he exposed are simply timeless!


I would like to suggest one thing. My nickname is what it is but I would never ever tried to ...overestimate meaining of Sheakspeare in the world of biggest world's literature.

During his lifetime he was a successful author/actor in times where theatre was extremely popular. Many reasons of it.
Then he was forgotten for long, long times as far as I know.
Finally his compatriots found him to have someone who could beat all what ancient Rome has left till today.
Doth Brits have always been sure they happened to be the best people in the world.

Well... did they really beat all ancient big poets with one Sheakspeare? :roll:

But... but... they did the best business on his plays. That is rather no doubt to me. Rome's poets performances must have been not half as expensive as Sheakspeare's have always been! :(

LM

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Re: about ...Sheakspeare.

Postby illusion » Tue Aug 21, 2007 8:43 am

LadyMacbeth wrote:Hello :)

For Shame! Shakespeare's era was, is and will be forever because the truths contained in his works are immortal and despite the huge amount of time that has passed since he wrote, the things he wrote about and emotions he exposed are simply timeless!


I would like to suggest one thing. My nickname is what it is but I would never ever tried to ...overestimate meaining of Sheakspeare in the world of biggest world's literature.

During his lifetime he was a successful author/actor in times where theatre was extremely popular. Many reasons of it.
Then he was forgotten for long, long times as far as I know.
Finally his compatriots found him to have someone who could beat all what ancient Rome has left till today.
Doth Brits have always been sure they happened to be the best people in the world.

Well... did they really beat all ancient big poets with one Sheakspeare? :roll:

But... but... they did the best business on his plays. That is rather no doubt to me. Rome's poets performances must have been not half as expensive as Sheakspeare's have always been! :(

LM



oh yeah, why did you ever choose that nickname? Do you want to follow your nickname's character's path?

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hello illusion :)

Postby LadyMacbeth » Tue Aug 21, 2007 4:05 pm

Hello all Sheakespeare's fans :)

Well... I would never ever tell anyone from Warsaw what should be done! Never ever indeed!!!

But what I like much more than my own gory personality are - for example - nice, fresh and sound Celtic poems...

I would rather cite them than my own words here or there (still not a single word about my deeds )! :ups:

So one of my favourite cites if anyone cares... :)

A Celtic Blessing

May the road rise up
To meet you.

May the wind be always
At your back.

May the sun shine warm
upon your face.

May the rain fall soft
upon your field,

And until we meet again.
May God hold you in the palm of his hand.

A Celtic Prayer

Deep peace of the
running waves to you.

Deep peace of the
flowing air to you.

Deep peace of the
quiet earth to you.

Deep peace of the
shining stars to you.

Deep peace of the
Son of Peace to you.

LM

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Postby Bambang » Wed Aug 22, 2007 4:50 pm

I didn't mean to let the Shakespeare's fans down. However, let's analyse one of his "spectacular" work of art namely Romeo and Juliet.

At the end of the drama, we could see that finally the couple commit suicide in the name of love.

What kind of lesson can you give to the next generations? Commiting suicide is the best solution?
I would say that it's stupid instead of dramatic and touching ending.

Today's generation thinks that loving the opposite sex is everything. Life will be empty without that love. In some extent it's correct. But it's not totally correct.

Why not watch or read movies or books which can encourage us to face this life optimistically.

This is good advice:

DARE TO LIVE

instead of

LET'S DIE.



Ohhh... more advice:

Watch FEAR FACTOR or SURVIVAL. You'll be more realistic and optimistic in facing this beautiful life.

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Postby MissLT » Fri Aug 24, 2007 6:59 pm

"If you can't change your fate, change your attitude." (Amy Tan)

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Postby Krisi » Thu Oct 18, 2007 6:49 pm

Proverb:

"A great man is always willing to be little."

by: Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Postby Bambang » Sat Oct 20, 2007 4:51 am

krisi wrote:Proverb:

"A great man is always willing to be little."

by: Ralph Waldo Emerson



Yes, be a humble person.

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Postby Krisi » Sun Oct 21, 2007 12:42 am

The best index to a person's character is
(a) how he treats people who can't do him any good, and
(b) how he treats people who can't fight back.


- Abigail van Buren -

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Postby Tora » Mon Oct 22, 2007 6:47 am

bambang wrote:
krisi wrote:Proverb:

"A great man is always willing to be little."

by: Ralph Waldo Emerson



Yes, be a humble person.


Since I have read "David Copperfield" I can consider an attitude of "humble" as mean, disgusting, cunning slimy Uriah Heep only... it is more a negative characteristic of a person for me now

but I love krisi's posted quote :wink:

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Postby Krisi » Mon Oct 22, 2007 11:41 am

Tora wrote:
Proverb:

"A great man is always willing to be little."

by: Ralph Waldo Emerson


I love krisi's posted quote :wink:


Thanks. (I find you one among the great! :wink:)

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Postby Krisi » Tue Oct 23, 2007 7:06 am

I don't think of all the misery, but of all the beauty that still remains.
- Anne Frank -
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