There's many a slip twixt cup and lip

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Lone
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Posts: 75
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2005 3:47 pm

There's many a slip twixt cup and lip

Post by Lone » Mon Jul 09, 2012 1:40 am

Hi,

I found an English saying in dictionary: There’s many a slip ’twixt cup and lip.

I note that some dictionary place a raised comma before the word 'twixt' but some do not. My queries are:

1) What does the raised comma represent?
2) Do we need to put it in when we quote the English saying?

My hearty thanks!!!

Lone

darcy
Member
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 7:42 am
Status: English Teacher
Location: Oxford, UK

Re: There's many a slip twixt cup and lip

Post by darcy » Tue Jul 24, 2012 9:19 am

1) What does the raised comma represent?
It's an apostrophe (pronounced apostrofi) which represents missing letters, as in it'll (it will). The missing letters in 'twixt are b and e - betwixt. This is an old-fashioned word meaning between.

2) Do we need to put it in when we quote the English saying?
Yes, if you want to be correct. Apostrophes are not normally left out.

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