Example for 'whereabouts' used as adjective

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DavidDe
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Example for 'whereabouts' used as adjective

Post by DavidDe » Fri Jan 31, 2014 12:10 am

Hello all,
Babylon dictionary has indicated that 'whereabouts' can be used as an adjective! Hint: where?; near where?
However, I don't really know how it can be used as an adjective in a sentence.
You may furnish me with an example.

Mush appreciation.

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Joe
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Re: Example for 'whereabouts' used as adjective

Post by Joe » Sat Feb 08, 2014 8:32 am

The word "whereabouts" is an adverb (Whereabouts does he live?) or a noun (The police would like to know his whereabouts). It's not an adjective in my dictionaries and it's hard to imagine it being so.

DavidDe
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Re: Example for 'whereabouts' used as adjective

Post by DavidDe » Sun Feb 09, 2014 5:52 pm

Here is the definition literally given by Babylon dictionary for word "whereabouts" :

n. locality, location, place; place where something or someone is; surroundings; dwelling place
conj. in which place?; near which place?
adv. where?; near where?

I agree with you; it is difficult to imagine this can be used as adjective. Thanks for giving your opinion.

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Joe
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Re: Example for 'whereabouts' used as adjective

Post by Joe » Mon Feb 17, 2014 1:51 am

DavidDe wrote:Here is the definition literally given by Babylon dictionary for word "whereabouts" :

n. locality, location, place; place where something or someone is; surroundings; dwelling place
conj. in which place?; near which place?
adv. where?; near where?
I don't see any reference to adjectives there. The abbreviation "adv." is for "adverb".

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