This train goes (through) to Portland.

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paracompact
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This train goes (through) to Portland.

Post by paracompact » Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:06 am

(1) This train goes to Portland.

(2) This train goes through to Portland.

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences?

Lolfaceftw
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Re: This train goes (through) to Portland.

Post by Lolfaceftw » Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:57 pm

"to" means going to that direction.
"through" going in from this, going out from that.

So in 1., the train goes towards Portland.

In 2., the train goes inside of Portland then goes outside.

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Joe
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Re: This train goes (through) to Portland.

Post by Joe » Thu Jan 16, 2020 2:05 pm

paracompact wrote:
Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:06 am
(1) This train goes to Portland.

(2) This train goes through to Portland.

What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences?
Basically they both mean the same thing: the train ends up in Portland.

Depending where you are, and which railway, the "through" might mean it's a non-stop train - it doesn't stop at any stations on the way to Portland. That is sometimes called a through train.
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paracompact
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Re: This train goes (through) to Portland.

Post by paracompact » Fri Jan 17, 2020 2:16 am

Thank you very much, Joe.

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