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Quantifiers

Quantifiers are determiners that describe quantity in a noun phrase. They answer the question "How many?" or "How much?" on a scale from no (0%) to all (100%).

We use some quantifiers only with countable nouns. We use some other quantifiers only with uncountable nouns. And we use some with countable or uncountable nouns.

The table below shows quantifiers that can indicate quantity from 0% to 100%. Notice which ones can be used with countable, uncountable or both:

  countable uncountable
100% all
every  
  most
many much
some
(a) few
fewest
(a) little
least
any
0% no

Like all determiners, quantifiers come at the beginning of a noun phrase, so they come in front of any adjective(s).

Look at these example sentences:

  • I want all the eggs and I want all the red wine.
  • Please give me every egg you have.
  • Who has the most eggs? Who has the most money?
  • We don't have many eggs. We don't have much money.
  • I have some eggs. I have some money.
  • I have a few eggs. I have a little money.
  • I don't have any eggs. I don't have any money.
  • We had no eggs. We had no money.

There are other quantifiers such as enough and several that cannot easily be shown on a scale:

  • We have enough eggs for the party. No need to buy any.
  • There are several eggs in the fridge but you'd better buy some more.