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Idioms Quiz: Sports 2

This quiz tests you on sports idioms.

1. on the ball

Someone really needs to be on the ball if they work as

a. a life model in a painter's studio

b. a dishwasher in a restaurant

c. an air-traffic controller at an airport

2. par for the course

If people say it's "par for the course" when a train arrives late, it means the train is

a. usually on time

b. always on time

c. often late

3. plain sailing

We drove to Paris, and after getting out of London it was plain sailing all the way because

a. there was hardly any traffic

b. it rained so much it was flooding

c. we had a strong westerly tailwind

4. quick off the mark

If someone is quick off the mark, they do something

a. before most other people

b. after most other people

c. better than most other people

5. run rings around | run circles around

After running rings around his competitor for the whole fight, the boxer from Cuba

a. clearly lost the fight on points

b. was disqualified for running too much

c. won the fight easily

6. skate on thin ice

We'll be skating on thin ice if we go to the boss and

a. ask for another pay rise

b. give him a birthday present

c. tell him what a good boss he is

7. the ball's in your court

If you're bargaining with someone and they say "the ball's in your court" it means they think

a. the negotiation is over

b. it's your turn to name a price

c. you're demanding too much

8. the name of the game

Tiger says that in golf, the name of the game is

a. knowing the right people

b. wearing the right clothes

c. keeping your concentration

9. wide of the mark

The weather forecast for today was wide of the mark. It's been a beautiful sunny day, but the forecast said it would be

a. fine and dry

b. wet and windy

c. clear and warm

10. You can't win them all.

I looked at my tennis partner and said, "You can't win 'em all"

a. before we'd lost our match

b. after we'd lost our match

c. after we'd won our match

NB: you can also print this quiz on paper.

1. on the ball - Someone really needs to be on the ball if they work as: a) a life model in a painter's studio b) a dishwasher in a restaurant c) an air-traffic controller at an airport

2. par for the course - If people say it's "par for the course" when a train arrives late, it means the train is: a) usually on time b) always on time c) often late

3. plain sailing - We drove to Paris, and after getting out of London it was plain sailing all the way because: a) there was hardly any traffic b) it rained so much it was flooding c) we had a strong westerly tailwind

4. quick off the mark - If someone is quick off the mark, they do something: a) before most other people b) after most other people c) better than most other people

5. run rings around | run circles around - After running rings around his competitor for the whole fight, the boxer from Cuba: a) clearly lost the fight on points b) was disqualified for running too much c) won the fight easily

6. skate on thin ice - We'll be skating on thin ice if we go to the boss and: a) ask for another pay rise b) give him a birthday present c) tell him what a good boss he is

7. the ball's in your court - If you're bargaining with someone and they say "the ball's in your court" it means they think: a) the negotiation is over b) it's your turn to name a price c) you're demanding too much

8. the name of the game - Tiger says that in golf, the name of the game is: a) knowing the right people b) wearing the right clothes c) keeping your concentration

9. wide of the mark - The weather forecast for today was wide of the mark. It's been a beautiful sunny day, but the forecast said it would be: a) fine and dry b) wet and windy c) clear and warm

10. You can't win them all. - I looked at my tennis partner and said, "You can't win 'em all": a) before we'd lost our match b) after we'd lost our match c) after we'd won our match

Contributor: Matt Errey