Search found 52 matches

by Weibing
Sun Jan 20, 2008 12:42 am
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: How to use 'the' correctly
Replies: 9
Views: 12329

Re: How to use 'the' correctly

First to my friend Kevin, thank you Kevin ! Your positive feedback is always encouraging - I, probably not just I, really appreciate it! Because according to your profile you are a doctor (which without further qualification one would normally take to be a doctor of medicine). There is no reference ...
by Weibing
Tue Jan 15, 2008 3:16 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: How to use 'the' correctly
Replies: 9
Views: 12329

Re: How to use 'the' correctly

Dear EC, Thanks for your timely response and notice. I really know this forum is for teachers, but I really want to know if that means anyone who isn't a teacher or at least doesn't register as a teacher isn't allowed to join in and to post here?! To some extent, I may not really be an English teac...
by Weibing
Fri Jan 11, 2008 2:52 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: How to use 'the' correctly
Replies: 9
Views: 12329

How to use 'the' correctly

Sounds easy?! If not, why? Some learners of English may find it tricky, especially for learners in Asia. Here is my two cents worth! 1. Life in this village is improving. 2. The life in this village is improving. 3. Please turn to page 12. 4. Please turn to the page 12. 5. Rights of the America peo...
by Weibing
Sat Dec 29, 2007 2:40 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: How to use plural nouns correctly
Replies: 9
Views: 32431

Re: How to use plural nouns correctly

Dear EC, Thank you very very much! To tell the truth, I wasn't expecting you would answer a post yourself. So, I decided to respond immediately to show my respect for you! 1. Even though one has run through all the basic rules on the plural form of nouns, the one will probably still find it not so ...
by Weibing
Thu Dec 27, 2007 3:12 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: How to use plural nouns correctly
Replies: 9
Views: 32431

Re: How to use plural nouns correctly

Hi oldie and Kevin, Merry Christmas & Happy New Year! Many thanks for your excellent responses! And I would add another interesting point: the plural form of uncountable nouns. It's not so easy a job to properly put an 's' after an uncountable noun. 1. ...many advanced equipment ... 2. ...many adva...
by Weibing
Sat Dec 22, 2007 3:19 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: How to use plural nouns correctly
Replies: 9
Views: 32431

How to use plural nouns correctly

I find it not easy to use plural nouns correctly. 1. ...patients with disease... 2. ...patients with diseases ... Which is correct or both? If both OK, then is there any difference in meaning between the two expressions? 3. ...sport center... 4. ... sports center... Usually, we have a singular noun...
by Weibing
Tue Nov 06, 2007 1:49 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: New member here, need advice, teaching children ages 5-12
Replies: 4
Views: 4308

You really need a book just as Kevin said, no matter how old your students are. But you should choose the proper book for your students to learn/read. Sounds to me you might need a beginner book to teach with and might as well teach them from the very beginning, the alphabet because your students do...
by Weibing
Wed Oct 03, 2007 2:25 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: Can or could?
Replies: 2
Views: 10538

Hi, Kevin, long time no see! Welcome back and thank you very much for your perfect answer! I'm glad you came back here again - I really like to enjoy your posts (informative but readable). Actually, I (maybe not only I) was hoping you would appear and continue to post - a dream come true now! As for...
by Weibing
Tue Sep 25, 2007 11:17 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: Can or could?
Replies: 2
Views: 10538

Can or could?

Hi guys, I decided to break the silence with a new thread. My query seems so simple or too general?! I know 'could' is the past form of 'can'. In addition to this obvious,basic distinction, can/could you give me some more suggestions on how to use 'could' properly? Thanks!
by Weibing
Sat Sep 22, 2007 9:15 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Prepositions
Replies: 8
Views: 10926

Lynn, I don't think I could explain the whole thing clearly enough for you. 'Off' , for instance, is a tricky preposition, with a lot of meanings - it could possibly mean 'not operating', 'not liking', 'away from', 'near to',etc. Keep in mind that one English word may have several Chinese counterpar...
by Weibing
Wed Sep 19, 2007 3:12 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Prepositions
Replies: 8
Views: 10926

Why would you, a native Chinese speaker, explain prepositions in English to Chinese speakers? Lynn, I presume that you think I should be familiar with the way English-Chinese in learning and teaching English. Yes, but now I find the way English-English is a better one. If I'm not so sure about an E...
by Weibing
Mon Sep 17, 2007 2:35 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Prepositions
Replies: 8
Views: 10926

Lynn, you are right, it's really difficult for Chinese people to learn English prepositons. Especially, (1)when a preposition is not followed by a noun group (the prepositon appears at the end of the sentence), (2)complex prepositonal object(such as 'from behind' ), (3)verb+preposition collocations ...
by Weibing
Sun Sep 02, 2007 12:52 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Prepositions
Replies: 8
Views: 10926

Lynn, yes, prepositions are hard for Chinese speakers to learn. In addition to prepositions, I should add the articles(a,an,the), the tense, the plural of nouns, etc. ' For me , it's difficult to learn.' 'To me , it's difficult to learn.' What's the difference between the above two sentences? I find...
by Weibing
Sat Aug 18, 2007 9:54 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Disciminatio in EFL teaching
Replies: 8
Views: 7524

Lynn, I can imagine how hard the situation could be when you're required to speak only English in teaching those kindergarten children. Actually, your Cantonese could have been very hlepful for the young children to understand a foreign language (totally strange to them). I really doubt the efficien...
by Weibing
Sat Aug 18, 2007 3:31 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Disciminatio in EFL teaching
Replies: 8
Views: 7524

Yes, Lynn, and I'd like to add a little more. It depends on the English proficiency or level of the students whether we should choose a native Englsih speaker or a non-native one to teach English. The latter is suitable to teach children English - in that very beginning stage, the children's mother ...
by Weibing
Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:44 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Why is Englishclub.com banned in Mexico?
Replies: 4
Views: 4886

I can't help putting pen to paper again. I'd say Englishclub.com is my favorite - it's really an excellent site to improve English skills. Until now, I haven't noticed any political intention here at this website. So, how come you think the Mexican government could have possibly banned this website?...
by Weibing
Mon Jul 16, 2007 12:17 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: He says or He said?
Replies: 7
Views: 5683

TS, 'Those' and 'Officials' in your citation are more general than 'The monastery' and 'Mistry', aren't they? 'Simple present' is often used in the headlines to impress readers, but it doesn't necessarily mean that it's also true when it's used in the context.
by Weibing
Sun Jul 15, 2007 12:16 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: He says or He said?
Replies: 7
Views: 5683

'Say' in the article was used to cite opinions in general , while 'said' in particular (a certain person's action or argument about whether or not the bull should be killed). TS, I'm not sure I have answered your question correctly. I've just tried to help. Be a little patient - somebody else might...
by Weibing
Fri Jul 13, 2007 10:30 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: He says or He said?
Replies: 7
Views: 5683

Both possible. Strictly according to English lauguage grammar, 'simple past' should be used. 'Simple present', however, is often used instead of 'simple past' in the news reports - probably in order to make the news sound or seem like somthing is happening at the moment, not just a past thing, and t...
by Weibing
Sun Jul 08, 2007 11:35 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Think in English
Replies: 6
Views: 6325

But when you want to write or to say something in English, you have to think in it! Usually, people have thoughts, feelings etc subconsciously, and most probably in their own language. If you like, however, you could immediately think the counterpart in English!
by Weibing
Sat Jul 07, 2007 1:41 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Happy birthday to EC
Replies: 2
Views: 3584

Happy birthday, happy birthday! - to this superb, remarkable, wonderful, distinguished, one of my most beloved website!!!
by Weibing
Fri Jul 06, 2007 11:11 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Think in English
Replies: 6
Views: 6325

Everyone could have thoughts or ideas, no matter what language they speak. If their mother tongue happens to be English or they have leared English, they could express their thoughts or ideas in the language English. I have thoughts and sometimes may have a good idea, but totally unaware what langua...
by Weibing
Thu Jul 05, 2007 1:22 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Difference between formal and informal English
Replies: 18
Views: 28270

Hello Lynn and Ben I appologize for taking so long to respond! As for the distinguish between formal and informal English, I'd like to add a little more. The degree of formality really depends on 'your audience' . You should be more formal to show your respect to the senior, respected, distinguished...
by Weibing
Thu Jun 28, 2007 1:24 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Difference between formal and informal English
Replies: 18
Views: 28270

Hi, Lynn and Ben,

So, we've come to the conclusion that it's appropriate to use idioms even in a formal situation.

Then comes another two questions:
1. What's formal or informal idioms?
2. Could the British understand AmE idioms well? Or vice versa?
by Weibing
Tue Jun 26, 2007 2:54 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: Difference between formal and informal English
Replies: 18
Views: 28270

Lynn, 'Add oil', a Chinese idiom, really has nothing to do with cooking, but may have something to do with driving. If you want a car to move quickly, you need to add more oil to the engine. 'Add oil! add oil!' is like 'go! go!' - imagine a cheerleader shouting encouragement at a sports event. As fo...