Search found 35 matches

by TS
Thu Jul 19, 2007 5:45 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: 'can' and 'able to' in the Past and Present
Replies: 1
Views: 3278

So we is it incorrect to say "He was not able to cross the ocean in a little boat"? Prior to internet epoch, the answer to an item of English use would depend on the say of English native speakers. But now there may be another source to know the answer. I searched exact match for "He was not able t...
by TS
Mon Jul 16, 2007 7:26 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: He says or He said?
Replies: 7
Views: 5832

TS, 'Those' and 'Officials' in your citation are more general than 'The monastery' and 'Mistry' , aren't they? 'Simple present' is often used in the headlines to impress readers, but it doesn't necessarily mean that it's also true when it's used in the context. I am afraid I have given my reasons i...
by TS
Sun Jul 15, 2007 5:10 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: He says or He said?
Replies: 7
Views: 5832

At first, Weibing said Simple Present is used to impress people: 'Simple present', however, is often used instead of 'simple past' in the news reports - probably in order to make the news sound or seem like somthing is happening at the moment, not just a past thing, and thus impress the listeners or...
by TS
Sat Jul 14, 2007 5:38 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: He says or He said?
Replies: 7
Views: 5832

The news link is still working and I notice further there is another use of Say that has escaped my observation before. Here I put it below: The 6-year-old Friesian bull tested positive for bovine tuberculosis in April. Under British law, animals suspected of carrying the disease must be slaughtered...
by TS
Sat Jul 14, 2007 6:49 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: He says or He said?
Replies: 7
Views: 5832

I mean Says and Said exist at the same news, rather in the news headlines, so it is hard for me to explain. If it is as you say "It's actually one of the characteristics of 'news writing' - tending to use 'simple present'", then in the whole news there should be all either He Said or He Says. Howeve...
by TS
Thu Jul 12, 2007 10:55 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: He says or He said?
Replies: 7
Views: 5832

He says or He said?

In the same news, why sometimes they use he says, and sometimes he said?

Your opinion is invited.
by TS
Sun Jun 17, 2007 2:31 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

Whose thought?
Whose proficiency?
To whom you are talking exactly?
by TS
Fri Jun 15, 2007 7:32 am
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

Dear all I don't know who keeps clicking "post reply" on this thread without then writing anything, but can they stop it. Kevin Vosper Is this a problem at all? I often use the editor here to edit the message without posting it at once. I have done it this way in any forums without problems. If thi...
by TS
Thu Jun 14, 2007 9:02 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

Firstly, words like, "obviously," "proving," and "learners," gives me the feeling that this is less a discussion among professionals and more an argument that you are determined to win. Is this fair to blame on these common words? ----------------------- I did search for "in the past three months" ...
by TS
Wed Jun 13, 2007 11:19 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

"In the past three months" to me describes..... So it is past time, and I would most commonly use the past simple to talk about things I did in that time: "I worked at GC, I went to New York City, I met my girlfriend, and I moved here." If it is true as you say, grammars will not hide the pattern o...
by TS
Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:28 am
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

John76 wrote:"In the past three months I worked at GC."
past tense

"In the past three months I have been working at GC."
past and present tense
In this case, according to you, we should not use Present Perfect "have worked". Am I correct?
by TS
Sun Jun 10, 2007 2:47 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

As to 'present perfect', I have a question for you, what's the difference between the two sentences below? 1. I have finished my homework. 2. I finished my homework. Present Perfect can be explained only in a paragraph of sentences. Please compare the following two examples. Ex1: "Yesterday Daddy g...
by TS
Sun Jun 10, 2007 2:12 am
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

have been working What do you mean? You believe what I said? Simple Past worked is a wrong tense for "In the past three months"? Can you say something and give your explanation? Why have been working and not worked ? Didn't you say that "in the past three months" is past tense ? What is your new id...
by TS
Sat Jun 09, 2007 9:29 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

correct tenses is only for grammar or writing for school or formal writing. in everyday conversation, english speakers use any tense they want and do not follow the rules. Then you are arguing with the one below: "DID you spend too much time online?" refers to the past "DO you spend too much time o...
by TS
Sat Jun 09, 2007 9:19 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

John76 wrote:examples:
"In the past three months I worked at GC."
I am afraid that here Simple Past worked is a wrong tense. Can anyone around here help?
by TS
Sat Jun 09, 2007 4:56 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

Before you learn the progressive tenses in questions, you have to learn them in ordinary sentences:
Ex: I run 3 miles every day.
Ex: I am running 3 miles every day.
Ex: I have been running 3 miles every day.

What are the differences between the three of them?
by TS
Sat Jun 09, 2007 4:48 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

If ' Do you spend too much time online?' refers to the past, then what about ' Did you spend too much time online?'?! I don't believe I have to repeat for so many times. The tense leading a question doesn't mean anything. You can use any tense to ask — because you don't know. If you know, why do yo...
by TS
Sat Jun 09, 2007 4:34 pm
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

Weibing wrote:2.'Since 2000' refers to a period of time - past time.
Then why do we use Present Perfect with past time as follows?
Ex: He has worked in the company since January.
by TS
Sat Jun 09, 2007 4:28 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

Actually, when we mention 'Yesterday', we have to use Simple Past, rather than Present Perfect. Do you have any explanation?
by TS
Sat Jun 09, 2007 7:00 am
Forum: Grammar and Usage
Topic: What kind of time is Since 2000?
Replies: 36
Views: 44524

John76 wrote:"since 2000" is both past and present tense.
"in the past three months" is past tense.
Examples?
by TS
Sat Jun 09, 2007 4:38 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

time is the difference, i believe. 1) a short time ago (eg: i just finished) 2) a longer period of time passed As for " longer period of time passed", LATELY is much longer than YESTERDAY. But the former may use Present Perfect, and the latter needs to use Simple Past: Ex: I have seen him lately . ...
by TS
Fri Jun 08, 2007 3:51 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

Man : I'm so tired and exhausted! Woman : Are you spending too much time online? (or, do you spend too much time online?) It seems to me that both questions are possible and just the same. We have talked about this. You may use any tense to ask question: Ex: Did you spend too much time online? Ex: ...
by TS
Fri Jun 08, 2007 3:50 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

2.In the News Attack kills 14. (Exactly: Attack killed 14.) (In such case, simple present just means 'finished'.) (There are plenty of such cases in the news.) I have quoted examples with the links. Where are your links? Did you quote only the title? As the title reveals a fact (Attack kills 14), S...
by TS
Fri Jun 08, 2007 1:51 am
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

To my best knowledge, after thinking over my quesiton twice again, I wonder if there really is any difference between the two. Me too. But my reason is: I am afraid the tense leading a question doesn't mean anything. What I mean is, you can use any tense to ask — because you don't know. If you know...
by TS
Thu Jun 07, 2007 11:16 pm
Forum: General Teacher Discussion
Topic: What's the difference of this two sentences?
Replies: 27
Views: 16630

Simply put, my point is: -- Present Progressive action indicates a new action. -- Present Perfect Progressive action indicates an old action. In my youth, I analyzed a copy of Time magazine and noted that 70 percent of Present Progressive sentences were with the adjective new in the proximity, just ...