Do you use with or to

For general discussion between ESL teachers.

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cougarcar1
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Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 9:25 am

Do you use with or to

Unread post by cougarcar1 » Mon Jun 05, 2006 9:46 am

I will communicate with John
or
I will communicate to John

A student asked me as a previous Teacher told him you could only use to.
I said either is fine
Thanks for your help

Bertram
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Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:30 am

communicate

Unread post by Bertram » Thu Sep 07, 2006 3:24 am

I think you can use both depending on the circumstance. Please send your communication to Max. I want the two computers to communicate with each other.

By the way do you know how to work out what 'this' and 'these' are. I think they are determiners. Are they also some sort of pronoun?

Bertram
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Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Sep 07, 2006 2:30 am

communicate

Unread post by Bertram » Thu Sep 07, 2006 3:24 am

I think you can use both depending on the circumstance. Please send your communication to Max. I want the two computers to communicate with each other.

By the way do you know how to work out what 'this' and 'these' are. I think they are determiners. Are they also some sort of pronoun?

cougarcar1
Member
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 9:25 am

Re: communicate

Unread post by cougarcar1 » Thu Sep 07, 2006 3:41 am

yes (this) is singular form
(these) is plural form
example--- This is a pen.
--- These are pens
Hope this helps you.
Peter

GiddyGad
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Joined: Thu May 12, 2005 3:17 pm

Unread post by GiddyGad » Thu Sep 07, 2006 5:35 pm

Yes, both this/that and these/those can work not only as determiners but as pronouns as well, for example:

You used to supply us with cardboard display wrappers. Could you let me have a firm quote for a thousand of those?

If it helps,

GiddyGad

geri402
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Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 5:47 am

Re: communicate

Unread post by geri402 » Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:06 am

In English the singular demonstrative adjectives are "this" and "that", while the plural ones are"these" and "those" Their function is to point at something and some grammarians refer to them as "demonstrative determiners"
I hope you find this information helpful [/quote] :D

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