Should we ban the native language in the class room?

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Mr.Libyan
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Should we ban the native language in the class room?

Unread post by Mr.Libyan » Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:13 pm

Should we ban the native language in the class room?

Lynn
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Unread post by Lynn » Tue Jul 03, 2007 12:34 pm

It depends on the classroom, the age of students, their reasons for studying, school policy, your goals for the class, how students will apply classroom skills in their daily lives and probably a host of other factors. Probably the most important factor is school policy. After that, you're on your own.
Blessings <>< Lynn
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Mr.Libyan
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Unread post by Mr.Libyan » Wed Jul 04, 2007 11:44 pm

But what do you think of this statement in first lecture:
Hello class, we're here to learn English , no native language in this class any more.........

Lynn
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Unread post by Lynn » Thu Jul 05, 2007 2:01 am

But what do you think of this statement in first lecture:
Hello class, we're here to learn English , no native language in this class any more.........
That's fine. Many teachers do it this way. I have done this, usually with good results. Sometimes the size of the class makes it impossible for a teacher to monitor all communications between students. Sometimes a student will ask a neighbour for help understanding an English phrase, and that conversation is almost always in the native language. I take the approach that if the student needs a bit of translation along the way, let him have it. Then pull him back into the main class and involve him in English conversation, using the skills he is working on.
Blessings <>< Lynn
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Mr.Libyan
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Unread post by Mr.Libyan » Thu Jul 05, 2007 8:06 am

And what about mixing the speech with some native words when it's necessary to carry on speaking?

Lynn
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Unread post by Lynn » Thu Jul 05, 2007 9:31 am

Even I do that! Sometimes it's the only intelligible way to say something, and it reflects the way business is done here. I don't know about other parts of the world. In Hong Kong, many people speak a variety of Chinglish. English speakers use Cantonese in their dialog and Cantonese speakers use English words in theirs. When this happens in a local classroom, it simply reflects the way this culture uses language. I understand this may not be the way language is used in many societies. Of course, classroom teaching must prepare students to function in their world.

Now, after all the above, I still think the best way to learn any language is total immersion. Therefore, an English only rule in the classroom would be the best way to teach. If a native word or two becomes absolutely necessary
in order to carry on speaking
, use it, but be sure to teach the correct English equivalent so that the next time, English can be used.

Do I sound like I'm contradicting myself? Sorry for that. The truth is, there are several viable ways to teach language. We need to employ the method that works best for our students.

Mr.Libyan
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Unread post by Mr.Libyan » Thu Jul 05, 2007 11:32 am

Lynn... Thanks so much for all you have said.

Shelley
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Unread post by Shelley » Wed Aug 01, 2007 10:13 am

For me the main factor is the level of the class. If you are teaching beginners to lower intermediate it can be very useful to be able to revert to the native language to explain how to play a game or an activity.

One can get by exclusively in English even with beginners by using diagrams pictures and body language, but if one has the luxury of being able to communicate in the native language then I am all for it if it helps keep the class moving along at a cracking pace rather than stalling over a communication problem.

Very young children are also reassured by the use of their native language in class, and to try to explain some games in English to 3 year old beginners, well good luck...!

From intermediate upwards one should be able to drop the native language altogether.

As helpfully mentioned by others one does have to comply with the school policy, after all, they pay you!

Kind regards
Shelley Vernon
http://www.teachingenglishgames.com
Free English language games for children
and
http://www.teachingenglishgames.com/3-5.htm
Free mini-series of games and stories for preschool children learning English

Ele
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Using native language

Unread post by Ele » Fri Aug 10, 2007 9:16 am

Hello.

I am doing a research on exactly this problem: using translation in a language classroom. I have compiled a questionnaire and would you please take time to answer it? I could forward to by email if itnerested.

Any questions or ideas: elepran_libra@yahoo.com

Thanks!

Ele

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