Is "It's a sunny night" a valid sentence?

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cyphever1
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Is "It's a sunny night" a valid sentence?

Unread postby cyphever1 » Sun Jul 30, 2006 2:44 pm

Can the word "sunny" be applied to night time?

joannap73
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Re: Sunny night

Unread postby joannap73 » Sun Jul 30, 2006 6:01 pm

Of course grammatically it's correct, but semantically it's a just a little weird! There's no sun shining on a person when it's "night" for them, so I'd say the sentence doesn't fly. However, perhaps the author meant it was "hot" and got the words confused? That's my best guess!

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interesting huh!?

Unread postby Jump Start ! » Wed Aug 02, 2006 6:00 am

Joannap73, hello.
you are diffenitely right. yeah that's grammatically right; but not generally true. however, i have a guess that the author is trying to make his own idiom....??? could be...hehe
[b]"To be a better teacher is not only to know each students by name but most importantly to know how to use the right motivation to learn your subject..."[b] [i]I love my Babe [i]

joannap73
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re: sunny night

Unread postby joannap73 » Wed Aug 02, 2006 6:28 pm

An-yong-ha-sae- yo, Jump! :)

Good theory :). I like the idea of a sunny night as an idiom! Who knows what the writer meant, but I like it as an idiom - kind of pretty! Like a happy, wonderful night.

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Unread postby GiddyGad » Wed Aug 02, 2006 8:44 pm

I understood it as an oxymoron.

Cheers,

GiddyGad

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Unread postby Jump Start ! » Sun Aug 06, 2006 12:05 pm

so, could be also that the author is happy and feel so bright on that night he said it...hehehe
[b]"To be a better teacher is not only to know each students by name but most importantly to know how to use the right motivation to learn your subject..."[b] [i]I love my Babe [i]

joannap73
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Re: sunny night interpretations

Unread postby joannap73 » Sun Aug 06, 2006 6:23 pm

So one thing is for sure: We don't know what the author meant, because we can't ask him or her. :wink: I remember my professors always having really strange interpretations of literature, and I thought, "Where did they get THAT meaning???" You can invent anything, I guess, if you don't know the author's intentions for sure. :) As for this 'sunny night' sentence, the last post-er's idea (Seoul, Korea) is my favorite! Very poetic. I might even use it as an example in my ELL class this year. :D

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Unread postby SaudQ8 » Mon Aug 07, 2006 2:45 am

This question remindes me in a famous sentence written by Chomsky "Colorless green Idea walks furtiously." When we look at this sentence from a grammatical angle, it's absouloutly correct but it lacks the semantic feature. So, this is something weakening the Traditional Grammar that concerns only with the form instead of paying attention to both form and function. Anyway, I can say your phrase "a sunny night" is right but if ur intention is associated to a literary meaning because the literary language breaks the grammar and this is clear even in the canonical writers as Wordsworth and Shakespeare.

My Pleasure,

Saud :)

joannap73
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re: sunny night

Unread postby joannap73 » Mon Aug 07, 2006 4:53 pm

Great example! I think it's "colorless green ideas sleep furiously (not walk)".
You sound as much of a grammar nut as I am. :) (See my first post in this string.)

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Unread postby Jump Start ! » Wed Aug 09, 2006 12:25 pm

Thanks joann... :)
[b]"To be a better teacher is not only to know each students by name but most importantly to know how to use the right motivation to learn your subject..."[b] [i]I love my Babe [i]

Estefania
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Unread postby Estefania » Fri Aug 18, 2006 3:19 pm

Have you been to Texas before? the sun is out until 9:00 pm during the summer. It CAN be sunny at night. :wink:

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Unread postby Jump Start ! » Sat Aug 19, 2006 9:13 am

that could be true Estefania ... even in Europe during summer, the sun sets at 9:30 pm. Of course, if there's a consistent explanation before or after that "It's sunny tonight!" sentence, I think it would be carefully considered. But if the sentence stands there alone without any explanation of how the author came up to that "sunny" thing, well,I don't know...and that's how I believe that we came up to a discussion using grammar rules, that is, if the sentence has general truth.

thanks.


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