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Help is needed

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mogli
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Help is needed

Unread postby mogli » Wed Oct 10, 2007 7:50 pm

I am a newly graduated teacher, sometimes in front of the students I don't know what to say or how to say because of excitement, or something like this. I have to overcome my excitement but I do not know how. Please somebody helps me.

Heads Up Eng
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Unread postby Heads Up Eng » Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:48 am

The first few weeks or months in front of the classroom can be difficult and nerve wracking. As long as you assess the positives and negatives of your lesson, you'll improve. Look at the good points, so that you can recreate them in future lessons. Look at the weak points to understand the problems, and then work to avoid these in the future.

If you're really nervous, then try practicing the lesson in your head, or even in front of a mirror--like a speech or presentation. You could also videotape your lesson, then watch it for feedback. You could even invite a colleague to observe some or all of your lesson, and get valuable feedback.

Don't worry, though, because you'll definitely improve over the coming class sessions.

Good luck!

Chris Cotter
Heads Up English - Materials based on current events. Just print, and teach!
http://www.headsupenglish.com

mogli
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Thank youuuuuuuuuu

Unread postby mogli » Thu Oct 11, 2007 6:17 pm

Heads Up Eng wrote:The first few weeks or months in front of the classroom can be difficult and nerve wracking. As long as you assess the positives and negatives of your lesson, you'll improve. Look at the good points, so that you can recreate them in future lessons. Look at the weak points to understand the problems, and then work to avoid these in the future.

If you're really nervous, then try practicing the lesson in your head, or even in front of a mirror--like a speech or presentation. You could also videotape your lesson, then watch it for feedback. You could even invite a colleague to observe some or all of your lesson, and get valuable feedback.

Don't worry, though, because you'll definitely improve over the coming class sessions.

Good luck!

Chris Cotter
Heads Up English - Materials based on current events. Just print, and teach!
http://www.headsupenglish.com


Thank you for your advice. I take them into consideration and I'll visit your site. I am sure I'll find many things useful for me. Meanwhile it is nice to meet you. See you! :P

Ben

Unread postby Ben » Mon Oct 15, 2007 8:00 am

Also try and remember that silence is an important part of teaching... don't be afraid to just leave a question hanging in the air. If your students learn that you will fill all the uncomfortable silences, then they just won't answer difficult questions. Teach them that they have to do the talking in class!

We all get nervous when we start doing something new. I still get nervous when I start a new class or a new level. So it's nothing unusual and you will notice it less and less as you teach. Good luck!

mogli
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Nice to meet you

Unread postby mogli » Mon Oct 15, 2007 8:49 am

thanks Ben for your kind advice. I realized that I felt myself more secure after each lesson. I try to be silent in the class when I am in trouble. Meanwhile I don't have any chance to speak native speakers so it is sometimes difficult for me to be fluent. When I am writing, there is no problem, I can write as the thoughts and opinions flow, I can write without thinking if I am rigth or not. But when I am speaking, I think many times before saying anything. So it is very boring for the person that I am talking to. How can I minimize the time that I spend thinking on what to say? :P Can you please help me?

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Unread postby msy_heaven » Mon Oct 22, 2007 4:22 pm

hi mogli, i am not an english native teacher.
your problem is like what i had.

firstly, i couldn't speak english fluently and i always had difficulty in speaking. i had got bad remark in speaking when i was in college. i was always confused in choosing what grammar i should use. consequently, i made many pauses just to make my speaking grammatically correct. when i talk to my friend, it would be OK. but, in front of the students, it would be horrible.

i realized that i have to be fluent in speaking english!!

fluent speaking

to make fluent in speaking english, we have to talk a lot. babies always talk, they don't think whether they are grammatically correct or not. the important thing is they talk and try to make people understand what they mean.

so, to make we fluent with english, the important thing is talking a lot. don't be bothered with the grammar. we can speak mother tongue, because we don't be afraid of mistakes. it doesn't matter your grammar is not correct. the important thing is you can speak flently and people understand what you mean.

for that reason, i tried to talk a lot. i set my mind with english and practiced it with my english teacher friends. we had commitment to not speaking with our mother tongue, even in long coversation.

then i had confidence to speak english. while i was trying to make my speaking well, i was trying to construct my words right.

i tried to speak english all day long. to peer teachers, to students, i tried to speak english.

to win confidence in front of the students, just remember: we are teacher, they are students.we have better english than the students. they will not understand whether we are right or wrong (this thought is bad actually, but it is useful to make us warm/not nervous in front of the students :D ). try to pay our mistakes by finding the correct words to say in another chance.

it is hard. but, we can make it if we think we can. don't give up. little by little, with lots of practice we can make it. trust your self.

ddeubel
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Unread postby ddeubel » Thu Oct 25, 2007 1:53 pm

I second Ben's thoughts.

Try to get away from the idea and concept of standing infront of a group lecturing. Get them learning inductively, groups/pairs. Give them the materials and goals and let them find the way.

You might also see a lot of the great teacher videos at http://www.teachers.tv/teachingwithbayley

He has some great advice for teaching - whatever the subject!

David
http://eflclassroom.ning.com

Lynn
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Unread postby Lynn » Fri Oct 26, 2007 8:33 am

Mogli,

You've got a lot of good advice here already. I would just add one more thing: be sure that you prepare more than you actually need for each lesson. That way, you need not ever have nothing to say in front of the class. If they are working well in groups or pairs, then you don't need to say much, except to make corrections as you become aware of them. Sometimes it is not convenient or practical to practice your lesson before you teach it, but having a colleague sit in on your lessons and give you positive feedback is a gold mine for you - much better than watching a video of yourself.

Just one more thought. I don't know if this will work in your culture, but if it will, it can make classes work no matter what kind of mistakes you make. If you make a mistake in front of the class and you catch it and then correct it, point out to them what the error is and how they should avoid it. If one of your students catches the mistake, praise him and then explain how to avoid the same mistake. Make the learning process one of mutual accountablity. I have used this well with secondary students, often making mistakes on purpose for them to catch. It adds an aura of gaming to class that makes learning grammar fun.


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